April 21, 2014

(Source: pandanemar, via npr)

10:02am
  
Filed under: Reblogs Books Neil Gaiman 
April 21, 2014
Game of Thrones Is Just Getting Bloodier—and Better

Our roundtable on “Breaker of Chains,” the third episode of the HBO show’s fourth season.
Read more. [Image: Helen Sloan, courtesy of HBO]

Game of Thrones Is Just Getting Bloodier—and Better

Our roundtable on “Breaker of Chains,” the third episode of the HBO show’s fourth season.

Read more. [Image: Helen Sloan, courtesy of HBO]

April 21, 2014

(Source: timeisaflatcircus, via newsweek)

April 18, 2014
I Hate the Song-as-Flowchart Meme, And Here's Why You Should, Too

April 18, 2014
More Money Buys More Life: The Awful Consequence of Inequality

The income gap meets the longevity gap.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

More Money Buys More Life: The Awful Consequence of Inequality

The income gap meets the longevity gap.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

April 18, 2014
Do You Walk Enough?

April 18, 2014
Turning Bacon Into Bombs: The American Fat Salvage Committee

It turns out that bacon fat is good for more than sprucing up bitter greens—it’s also pretty good for making bombs. And during World War II, handing over cooking fat to the government was doing your patriotic duty.
The American Fat Salvage Committee was created to urge housewives to save all the excess fat rendered from cooking and donate it to the army to produce explosives. As explained to Minnie Mouse and Pluto in one wartime video, fats are used to make glycerin, and glycerin is used to make things blow up.
Read more. [Image: U.S. National Archives and Records Administration]

Turning Bacon Into Bombs: The American Fat Salvage Committee

It turns out that bacon fat is good for more than sprucing up bitter greens—it’s also pretty good for making bombs. And during World War II, handing over cooking fat to the government was doing your patriotic duty.

The American Fat Salvage Committee was created to urge housewives to save all the excess fat rendered from cooking and donate it to the army to produce explosives. As explained to Minnie Mouse and Pluto in one wartime video, fats are used to make glycerin, and glycerin is used to make things blow up.

Read more. [Image: U.S. National Archives and Records Administration]

April 18, 2014
The Site of Several 2016 Olympic Aquatic Events Has 195 Times the Safe Amount of Sewage in the Water

RIO DE JANEIRO – Tall and tan and young and lovely, the girl from Ipanema goes … “Ew, what’s that smell?”
At Ipanema beach in January, the organization Meu Rio staged a protest in an attempt to make it known that thousands of gallons of raw sewage are dumped into the ocean off Rio’s coast each day.
“For three months we held protests every weekend to turn an invisible problem into a visible one,” Leona Deckelbaum, the campaign coordinator with Meu Rio, said in a recent interview. Only about 34 percent of Rio’s sewage is treated, and the rest simply washes into the azure waters, giving new meaning to the nautical term poop deck.
Guanabara Bay, the site of several 2016 Olympic sailing events, has 78 times Brazil’s legally allowed limit of fecal pollution, and 195 times the U.S. limit. In addition to human waste, the bay is also a receptacle for trash from ships and the bay’s 15 adjacent communities, as well as toxic runoff from a former landfill. And its not just Guanabara–the ritzy Leblon and Ipanema beach areas are plagued with similar pollution problems. The state environmental agency, INEA, found that Leblon and Ipanema were unfit for swimming for 40 percent of 2011. Botafogo Beach had so much fecal pollution that it did not pass a single INEA test in 2013, according to the BBC. 
"In the waters just off Copacabana beach, the measurement of fecal coliform bacteria spiked to 16 times the Brazilian government’s satisfactory level as recently as three weeks ago, bad news for the marathon swimmers and triathletes set to compete there," the AP noted in November.
Olympic teams are getting grossed out and nervous.
Read more. [Image: Felipe Dana/AP]

The Site of Several 2016 Olympic Aquatic Events Has 195 Times the Safe Amount of Sewage in the Water

RIO DE JANEIRO – Tall and tan and young and lovely, the girl from Ipanema goes … “Ew, what’s that smell?”

At Ipanema beach in January, the organization Meu Rio staged a protest in an attempt to make it known that thousands of gallons of raw sewage are dumped into the ocean off Rio’s coast each day.

“For three months we held protests every weekend to turn an invisible problem into a visible one,” Leona Deckelbaum, the campaign coordinator with Meu Rio, said in a recent interview. Only about 34 percent of Rio’s sewage is treated, and the rest simply washes into the azure waters, giving new meaning to the nautical term poop deck.

Guanabara Bay, the site of several 2016 Olympic sailing events, has 78 times Brazil’s legally allowed limit of fecal pollution, and 195 times the U.S. limit. In addition to human waste, the bay is also a receptacle for trash from ships and the bay’s 15 adjacent communities, as well as toxic runoff from a former landfill. And its not just Guanabara–the ritzy Leblon and Ipanema beach areas are plagued with similar pollution problems. The state environmental agency, INEA, found that Leblon and Ipanema were unfit for swimming for 40 percent of 2011. Botafogo Beach had so much fecal pollution that it did not pass a single INEA test in 2013, according to the BBC

"In the waters just off Copacabana beach, the measurement of fecal coliform bacteria spiked to 16 times the Brazilian government’s satisfactory level as recently as three weeks ago, bad news for the marathon swimmers and triathletes set to compete there," the AP noted in November.

Olympic teams are getting grossed out and nervous.

Read more. [Image: Felipe Dana/AP]

April 18, 2014
Ike the Winter Soldier

Eisenhower’s glowing foreign-policy reputation ignores his tragic post-White House cheerleading for escalation in Vietnam.
Read more. [Image: Associated Press]

Ike the Winter Soldier

Eisenhower’s glowing foreign-policy reputation ignores his tragic post-White House cheerleading for escalation in Vietnam.

Read more. [Image: Associated Press]

April 18, 2014
Two Charts That Put China’s Pollution in Perspective

Everyone “knows” that China is badly polluted. I’ve written over the years, and still believe, that environmental sustainability in all forms is China’s biggest emergency, in every sense: for its people, for its government, for its effect on the world. And yes, I understand that the same is true for modern industrialized life in general. But China is an extreme case, and an extremely important one because of its scale.
Read more. [Image: NASA via Atlantic]

Two Charts That Put China’s Pollution in Perspective

Everyone “knows” that China is badly polluted. I’ve written over the years, and still believe, that environmental sustainability in all forms is China’s biggest emergency, in every sense: for its people, for its government, for its effect on the world. And yes, I understand that the same is true for modern industrialized life in general. But China is an extreme case, and an extremely important one because of its scale.

Read more. [Image: NASA via Atlantic]

Liked posts on Tumblr: More liked posts »