May 13, 2014
popculturebrain:

Ladies and gentlemen: Your Batman and his Batmobile | Zack Snyder

What do you guys think?

popculturebrain:

Ladies and gentlemen: Your Batman and his Batmobile | Zack Snyder

What do you guys think?

12:44pm
  
Filed under: Reblogs Film Batman Batfleck 
May 13, 2014

nevver:

Dead at 74, H.R. Giger

(Source: io9.com)

12:43pm
  
Filed under: Reblogs H.R. Giger 
May 13, 2014
Some Kids Get Charged Twice for One Crime

May 13, 2014
What Can You Do With a Degree in Watching TV?

As a 10-year-old in northern Idaho, Anne Helen Petersen was fascinated by celebrity culture. She’d tear through gossip magazines, giving ratings to different issues. Fast-forward 20 years, and she’s turned her obsession into a career reporting on media, writing about everything from the role of the paparazzi to Jennifer Lawrence’s “cool girl” image to the women in True Detective.  Her forthcoming book, Scandals of a Classic Hollywood, was borne out of a series of essays for The Hairpin.
Petersen also teaches film and media studies at Whitman College in Walla Walla, Washington—her courses cover subjects from celebrity gossip to Mad Men to Hollywood stardom. She spoke with me about her approach to teaching media studies and why she’s leaving academia to write features for Buzzfeed. 
Read more. [Image: National Archives and Records Administration/Wikimedia Commons]

What Can You Do With a Degree in Watching TV?

As a 10-year-old in northern Idaho, Anne Helen Petersen was fascinated by celebrity culture. She’d tear through gossip magazines, giving ratings to different issues. Fast-forward 20 years, and she’s turned her obsession into a career reporting on media, writing about everything from the role of the paparazzi to Jennifer Lawrence’s “cool girl” image to the women in True Detective.  Her forthcoming book, Scandals of a Classic Hollywood, was borne out of a series of essays for The Hairpin.

Petersen also teaches film and media studies at Whitman College in Walla Walla, Washington—her courses cover subjects from celebrity gossip to Mad Men to Hollywood stardom. She spoke with me about her approach to teaching media studies and why she’s leaving academia to write features for Buzzfeed.

Read more. [Image: National Archives and Records Administration/Wikimedia Commons]

May 13, 2014
Hollywood Should Make More, Not Fewer, Superhero Films

The rickety Amazing Spider-Man 2 has critics debating just how many superhero movies America can handle. This was the subject of Samuel Adams’s weekly survey at CriticWire, which led RogerEbert.com’s Matt Zoller Seitz to write a forceful essay declaring: “This genre is where imagination goes to drown itself.”
He levels many popular arguments against superhero movies, ranging from valid critique of some action cinematography to easy comparisons with junk food.  But the fact that there are real criticisms to be made of the movies the genre has produced doesn’t mean there’s something wrong with the genre, or that we should expect it to peter out soon.
The truth is, there aren’t nearly enough superhero movies available. By historical standards, we’re so deprived of superhero movies that there’s probably a shadow war being fought between paranormal forces of good and evil over the matter.
Read more. [Image: Columbia]

Hollywood Should Make More, Not Fewer, Superhero Films

The rickety Amazing Spider-Man 2 has critics debating just how many superhero movies America can handle. This was the subject of Samuel Adams’s weekly survey at CriticWire, which led RogerEbert.com’s Matt Zoller Seitz to write a forceful essay declaring: “This genre is where imagination goes to drown itself.”

He levels many popular arguments against superhero movies, ranging from valid critique of some action cinematography to easy comparisons with junk food.  But the fact that there are real criticisms to be made of the movies the genre has produced doesn’t mean there’s something wrong with the genre, or that we should expect it to peter out soon.

The truth is, there aren’t nearly enough superhero movies available. By historical standards, we’re so deprived of superhero movies that there’s probably a shadow war being fought between paranormal forces of good and evil over the matter.

Read more. [Image: Columbia]

May 13, 2014
You Post Your Kids' Photos to Facebook. Will the Machines Recognize Them as Adults?

May 13, 2014

patbaer:

jesslane:

baiovevo:

FIVE YEARS HE WAITED FIVE YEARS

I mean, this is cool.

well done. 

(via ryanhatesthis)

May 13, 2014
How Local Governments Are Hacking Immigration Reform

Only the federal government can grant amnesty. But cities and counties can effectively opt to stop deportations—and increasingly, they are.
Read more. [Image: Jim Young/Reuters]

How Local Governments Are Hacking Immigration Reform

Only the federal government can grant amnesty. But cities and counties can effectively opt to stop deportations—and increasingly, they are.

Read more. [Image: Jim Young/Reuters]

May 13, 2014
A Breathalyzer That Can Diagnose Cancer

If a fingerprint can tell someone who you are, a “breathprint” could reveal how you’re doing.
That’s according to Raed Dweik, the doctor who runs the pulmonary vascular program at the Cleveland Clinic’s Respiratory Institute.
For the past two decades, Dweik has been studying the molecular patterns in breath that can reveal what’s happening inside the body. In the same way that a pocket of air above the water level in a closed container carries signature molecules that reflect the composition of that water, our breath is directly linked to what’s happening in our blood.
"A lot of people just think breath is what’s in your lungs," Dweik told me. "We realize now that anything in your body that is eventually in the blood can be measured in your breath."
That includes diseases like lung cancer, liver disease, heart disease, asthma, and inflammatory bowel disease, all of which have “really distinct signatures in the breath,” Dweik says. And the medical implications are major: Breath-testing devices—think of them as Breathalyzers that detect disease rather than alcohol—can be just as accurate as traditional blood testing or biopsies, only cheaper and far less invasive.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

A Breathalyzer That Can Diagnose Cancer

If a fingerprint can tell someone who you are, a “breathprint” could reveal how you’re doing.

That’s according to Raed Dweik, the doctor who runs the pulmonary vascular program at the Cleveland Clinic’s Respiratory Institute.

For the past two decades, Dweik has been studying the molecular patterns in breath that can reveal what’s happening inside the body. In the same way that a pocket of air above the water level in a closed container carries signature molecules that reflect the composition of that water, our breath is directly linked to what’s happening in our blood.

"A lot of people just think breath is what’s in your lungs," Dweik told me. "We realize now that anything in your body that is eventually in the blood can be measured in your breath."

That includes diseases like lung cancer, liver disease, heart disease, asthma, and inflammatory bowel disease, all of which have “really distinct signatures in the breath,” Dweik says. And the medical implications are major: Breath-testing devices—think of them as Breathalyzers that detect disease rather than alcohol—can be just as accurate as traditional blood testing or biopsies, only cheaper and far less invasive.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

9:55am
  
Filed under: Technology Health Cancer Tech 
May 12, 2014
The Communist Manifesto, As a Patent Application

Great books—books that change the way we see the world, books that spur us along our paths as people and cultures—are, in their way, patents. They are innovations made manifest. They are ideas that are claimed by an author on behalf of the rest of us. They are cultural products that concern themselves, when they are at their very best, with hammocks. 
The artist and developer Sam Lavigne has taken these connections to a delightfully logical conclusion. Over at github, he posted a program that renders texts—literary, philosophical—as patent applications. “In short,” Lavigne explains, “it reframes texts as inventions or machines.” 
So! Kafka’s The Hunger Artist becomes “An apparatus and device for staring into vacancy.” Heidegger’s The Question Concerning Technology becomes “A device and system for belonging to bringing-forth.” And—my personal favorite—​The Communist Manifesto becomes “A method and device for comprehending theoretically the historical movement.” 
Read more. [Image: Sam Lavigne]

The Communist Manifesto, As a Patent Application

Great books—books that change the way we see the world, books that spur us along our paths as people and cultures—are, in their way, patents. They are innovations made manifest. They are ideas that are claimed by an author on behalf of the rest of us. They are cultural products that concern themselves, when they are at their very best, with hammocks

The artist and developer Sam Lavigne has taken these connections to a delightfully logical conclusion. Over at github, he posted a program that renders texts—literary, philosophical—as patent applications. “In short,” Lavigne explains, “it reframes texts as inventions or machines.” 

So! Kafka’s The Hunger Artist becomes “An apparatus and device for staring into vacancy.” Heidegger’s The Question Concerning Technology becomes “A device and system for belonging to bringing-forth.” And—my personal favorite—​The Communist Manifesto becomes “A method and device for comprehending theoretically the historical movement.”

Read more. [Image: Sam Lavigne]

6:35pm
  
Filed under: Design Ideas Patents Art Sam Lavigne 
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