September 20, 2011
"There’s a great myth about cartoonists, writers and people that are on TV. People are always giving you credit for really wanting to say more than you said. People say, ‘Boy, when you were on TV, I bet you really could have said a lot if they’d have let you,’ or ‘Gee, I’d like to see the cartoons that the magazine doesn’t print.’ This is bullshit. What you’ve got to say, you say. It’s always a nice feeling, having people think that you feel things much deeper than you’re allowed to say, but this isn’t true. If you want to find out what a writer or a cartoonist really feels, look at his work. That’s enough."

— Shel Silverstein, 1963. The author and illustrator of classics like Where the Sidewalk Ends and The Giving Tree has a posthumous collection out this month, Every Thing On It. Read more at The Atlantic

9:18am
  
Filed under: lit prose shel silverstein culture 
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