April 12, 2012
An Open Letter to Sarah Palin: Why Do You Mistreat Your Donors?

Ms. Palin,Your supporters trust you. For all their cynicism about politics, they believe that you’re different: a faithful Christian with small town values and a commitment to doing right by regular Americans. You’ve used that trust to ask homemakers, retirees and small businessmen and women to send you their money. As the Web page of your official political action committeeputs it, SarahPAC is “dedicated to building America’s future by supporting fresh ideas and candidates.”But that isn’t how you’ve been spending the money. Sure, you’ve given to candidates in the past. But you spent $418,000 in the first 3 months on 2012, and none of it has gone to candidates! Nor has it gone to “fresh ideas.” In fact, as Kenneth Vogel points out, it appears that you spent $19,000 on a video that argues an HBO film about your role in the 2008 presidential campaign gets its facts wrong. Is that correct? It’s 2 minutes and 38 seconds long.
Do you think that is worth $19,000? Or $1,000? Given that you have a popular Facebook page, regular gigs on national television, and the ability to summon multiple reporters to a press conference at any time, why would you spend $19,000 saying to very few people what you could’ve said free? Even if the short video is worth thousands to you, why do you think it’s appropriate to spend money raised on the promise that you’ll support fresh ideas and candidates on contesting events that a) happened in 2008; b) have no bearing on this year’s political races or issues; c) mostly just affects your reputation; d) is unlikely to change anyone’s opinion of it? Why should your donors bankroll this?
Read more. [Image: AP]

An Open Letter to Sarah Palin: Why Do You Mistreat Your Donors?

Ms. Palin,

Your supporters trust you. For all their cynicism about politics, they believe that you’re different: a faithful Christian with small town values and a commitment to doing right by regular Americans. You’ve used that trust to ask homemakers, retirees and small businessmen and women to send you their money. As the Web page of your official political action committeeputs it, SarahPAC is “dedicated to building America’s future by supporting fresh ideas and candidates.”

But that isn’t how you’ve been spending the money. 

Sure, you’ve given to candidates in the past. But you spent $418,000 in the first 3 months on 2012, and none of it has gone to candidates! Nor has it gone to “fresh ideas.” In fact, as Kenneth Vogel points out, it appears that you spent $19,000 on a video that argues an HBO film about your role in the 2008 presidential campaign gets its facts wrong. Is that correct? It’s 2 minutes and 38 seconds long.

Do you think that is worth $19,000? Or $1,000? Given that you have a popular Facebook page, regular gigs on national television, and the ability to summon multiple reporters to a press conference at any time, why would you spend $19,000 saying to very few people what you could’ve said free? Even if the short video is worth thousands to you, why do you think it’s appropriate to spend money raised on the promise that you’ll support fresh ideas and candidates on contesting events that a) happened in 2008; b) have no bearing on this year’s political races or issues; c) mostly just affects your reputation; d) is unlikely to change anyone’s opinion of it? 

Why should your donors bankroll this?

Read more. [Image: AP]

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  6. spencerkeys reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    Thinking about Scott Stratten’s talk and this example has got me thinking about a future blog post about branding and...
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  11. peaceshine3 reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    Sarah Palin pulled a fast one on you idiots that drank her flavor-aid
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  13. peterfeld said: This letter is misguided. Of all my complaints about Palin, her preventing money from reaching right-wing lunatic candidates isn’t one of them. Let her spend her money in ways that are harmless, as she’s doing.
  14. theatlantic posted this