May 17, 2012
The Rise of Female Rappers Has Nothing to Do With Gender

Female rappers have been around ever since the music’s inception, and over the years many of them proved themselves to be peerless writers and rappers, made deathless records, and contributed immensely to the form and the culture. But mainstream pop success has always been another story. Minaj ‘s cartoonishly exaggerated sexuality, giddy quick-fire rapping, adoption of multiple personas, and penchant for provocative spectacle have pushed pop music to new heights while also being enormously profitable. But before she exploded in 2010, there hadn’t been a charting female rapper since Missy Elliott in the early 2000s. Before Missy, Lauryn Hill had dominated the late ’90s, as Lisa “Left Eye” Lopes of TLC had dominated the mid-’90s, Queen Latifah the early ’90s, and Roxanne Shanté the mid-’80s. Just prior to the ascension of Minaj, Kid Sister and Lil Mama were the great female hopes of hip-hop. Ten years ago, it was Lil’ Kim, Da Brat, and Eve. Today, it’s Rye Rye, Azealia Banks, Brianna Perry, and Angel Haze, all of whose prospects are boosted by Minaj’s unprecedented success, their own unconventional styles, and the hit-making potential of the Internet.
Read more. [Image: N.E.E.T.]

The Rise of Female Rappers Has Nothing to Do With Gender

Female rappers have been around ever since the music’s inception, and over the years many of them proved themselves to be peerless writers and rappers, made deathless records, and contributed immensely to the form and the culture. But mainstream pop success has always been another story. Minaj ‘s cartoonishly exaggerated sexuality, giddy quick-fire rapping, adoption of multiple personas, and penchant for provocative spectacle have pushed pop music to new heights while also being enormously profitable. But before she exploded in 2010, there hadn’t been a charting female rapper since Missy Elliott in the early 2000s. Before Missy, Lauryn Hill had dominated the late ’90s, as Lisa “Left Eye” Lopes of TLC had dominated the mid-’90s, Queen Latifah the early ’90s, and Roxanne Shanté the mid-’80s. Just prior to the ascension of Minaj, Kid Sister and Lil Mama were the great female hopes of hip-hop. Ten years ago, it was Lil’ Kim, Da Brat, and Eve. Today, it’s Rye Rye, Azealia Banks, Brianna Perry, and Angel Haze, all of whose prospects are boosted by Minaj’s unprecedented success, their own unconventional styles, and the hit-making potential of the Internet.

Read more. [Image: N.E.E.T.]

  1. wanderingphilosopher reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    I am SOooo behind on this one… Gonna have to check her o.u.t!!
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