May 17, 2012
How and Why American Cities Are Coming Back

When one thinks of the larger demographic changes that have taken place in America over the last generation — the increased number of people who remain single, the rise of cohabitation, the later age of first marriage, the smaller size of families, and at the other end, the rapidly growing number of healthy and active adults in their later years — it’s hard to escape the notion that we have managed to combine virtually all the significant elements that make a demographic inversion not only possible but likely. I want to emphasize that I’m not predicting a massive invasion of the cities by middle-aged suburbanites and their children. I’m mostly suggesting that the emerging millennial generation — the second largest generation in American history, second only to the baby boomers — will find an urbanized form of life attractive. They will move to cities as singles; as couples; as young married families with small children. Will they want to live in the city when their children reach school age? I believe many of them will, but there is certainly room for debate on this subject.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

How and Why American Cities Are Coming Back

When one thinks of the larger demographic changes that have taken place in America over the last generation — the increased number of people who remain single, the rise of cohabitation, the later age of first marriage, the smaller size of families, and at the other end, the rapidly growing number of healthy and active adults in their later years — it’s hard to escape the notion that we have managed to combine virtually all the significant elements that make a demographic inversion not only possible but likely. I want to emphasize that I’m not predicting a massive invasion of the cities by middle-aged suburbanites and their children. I’m mostly suggesting that the emerging millennial generation — the second largest generation in American history, second only to the baby boomers — will find an urbanized form of life attractive. They will move to cities as singles; as couples; as young married families with small children. Will they want to live in the city when their children reach school age? I believe many of them will, but there is certainly room for debate on this subject.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

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  17. brooklynese said: So true, growing up in NYC and leaving to come to GA for college was so strange b/c you had to drive EVERYWHERE. Urban areas function better, if they are properly managed. The social ramifications of suburbia also have a huge impact, but thats TMI.
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    How and Why American Cities Are Coming Back When one thinks of the larger demographic changes that have taken place in...