May 24, 2012
Why Is General McChrystal Teaching an Off-the-Record Course at Yale?

McChrystal, who formerly led special operations forces in Iraq and Afghanistan and later became a senior American commander in Afghanistan, now teaches a class at Yale’s Grand Strategy Program, where he integrates his military experience with his studies on leadership. In the New York Times, McCyrstal is quoted as saying “the only reason I’m here to teach,” compared with “somebody who’s got a Ph.D., is because I’ve been through it.”
McChrystal must have been through something ominous because, according to Elisabeth Bumiller’s  Times article, Yale University imposes restrictions on students who sit in McChrystal’s classes, demanding that they take notes on an “off the record” basis — i.e., not for attribution.
Yale’s extraordinary act seems drastically out of place with notions of academic and intellectual freedom. At the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, where I teach history, intellectual freedom is fiercely encouraged and protected. In addition, there is also accountability. No matter what I say in my history classes - either about history or my combat experience — cadets are free to tell it to the world, critique it, or reject it privately or publicly. Restrictions on cadets don’t exist even for an instructor with direct ties to the U.S. military.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

Why Is General McChrystal Teaching an Off-the-Record Course at Yale?

McChrystal, who formerly led special operations forces in Iraq and Afghanistan and later became a senior American commander in Afghanistan, now teaches a class at Yale’s Grand Strategy Program, where he integrates his military experience with his studies on leadership. In the New York Times, McCyrstal is quoted as saying “the only reason I’m here to teach,” compared with “somebody who’s got a Ph.D., is because I’ve been through it.”

McChrystal must have been through something ominous because, according to Elisabeth Bumiller’s  Times article, Yale University imposes restrictions on students who sit in McChrystal’s classes, demanding that they take notes on an “off the record” basis — i.e., not for attribution.

Yale’s extraordinary act seems drastically out of place with notions of academic and intellectual freedom. At the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, where I teach history, intellectual freedom is fiercely encouraged and protected. In addition, there is also accountability. No matter what I say in my history classes - either about history or my combat experience — cadets are free to tell it to the world, critique it, or reject it privately or publicly. Restrictions on cadets don’t exist even for an instructor with direct ties to the U.S. military.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

  1. penamerican reblogged this from theatlantic
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  4. mwfrost reblogged this from pegobry and added:
    Easy prediction: off-the record access to celebrity “instructors” is going to be a popular way for expensive...
  5. pegobry reblogged this from theatlantic
  6. lastroadtotruth reblogged this from infoneer-pulse
  7. kkuryla reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    Yale has restrictions in place when West Point does not? Tell me that doesn’t sound fishy!
  8. failedfuturist reblogged this from infoneer-pulse
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  10. whenimreallyathundacat reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    Sounds kind of shady. This man’s class needs some transparency.
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    via theatlantic
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