February 23, 2011
Anna Louie Sussman explores how Egyptian protestors deploy satire, irony, and mockery against Mubarak’s regime.

Parody, Linda Hutcheons has written, repeats something familiar, but with a “potentially revolutionary" difference. For Egyptians, did it get any more familiar than Hosni Mubarak, whose rule lasted 29 long years? Whose Dracula-like face peered down from signs and framed official photographs all over the country (photographs that seemed to freeze him in the Twilight Zone of his mid-fifties, where his hair color still remains)? Who greeted them every morning from their state television and state-owned newspapers? As Issandr El Amrani asked in his eerily prescient article on Mubarak jokes written for Foreign Policy two months before the revolution began: What would happen if you spent three decades making fun of the same man? 

Read the rest at The Atlantic. 

Anna Louie Sussman explores how Egyptian protestors deploy satire, irony, and mockery against Mubarak’s regime.

Parody, Linda Hutcheons has written, repeats something familiar, but with a “potentially revolutionary" difference. For Egyptians, did it get any more familiar than Hosni Mubarak, whose rule lasted 29 long years? Whose Dracula-like face peered down from signs and framed official photographs all over the country (photographs that seemed to freeze him in the Twilight Zone of his mid-fifties, where his hair color still remains)? Who greeted them every morning from their state television and state-owned newspapers? As Issandr El Amrani asked in his eerily prescient article on Mubarak jokes written for Foreign Policy two months before the revolution began: What would happen if you spent three decades making fun of the same man? 

Read the rest at The Atlantic

(Source: The Atlantic)

11:53am
  
Filed under: egypt international 
  1. hamztekz reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    des making fun of the same man? LOOOL!
  2. theatlantic posted this