January 17, 2013

Why We Shouldn’t Mock the Idea of an Eiffel Tower in Hangzhou

Architects and critics within and beyond China have treated these derivative designs with scorn, as shameless kitsch or simply trash. Others cite China’s larger knock-off culture, from handbags to housing, as evidence of the innovation gap between China and the United States. For a larger audience on the Internet, they are merely a punchline, another example of China’s endlessly entertaining wackiness.

In short, the majority of Chinese architectural imitation, oozing with historical romanticism, is not taken seriously.

But perhaps it ought to be.

See more. [Images: Bianca Bosker]

  1. offnion reblogged this from theatlantic
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    God, they think *THAT’s* British architecture? My God! Have they not seen Blenhim Place?
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    it really has no point to copy historical monuments because they have, in fact, history. I mean, what’s the point of...
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    Our summer vacation
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