July 8, 2013
Reddit: A Pre-Facebook Community in a Post-Facebook World

Because social networks like Facebook are all about who you know, they tend to be obsessed with authenticated identities. From its roots on elite college campuses, accepting only users with .edu email addresses, Facebook has had a “real name policy,” which allows the site to remove the accounts of users who are using pseudonyms, arguing that online behavior is better when people are required to own their words. Google has followed suit, urging users to use real names on Google Plus and on YouTube. (These policies have raised questions from the human rights community, which points out that activists using online tools have valid reasons to conceal their identities, as do youth exploring sensitive questions around gender and sexuality.)
Reddit, by contrast, doesn’t care who you are or who you know offline. Reddit names are unconnected to real-world identities and it’s commonplace for users to create “throwaway” accounts to reveal sensitive information. In this sense, Reddit is more like the pre-social media Internet, when a New Yorker cartoonist could reasonably joke “On the Internet, no one knows you’re a dog.”
Read more. [Image: Reddit, by way of Facebook (Facebook.com)]

Reddit: A Pre-Facebook Community in a Post-Facebook World

Because social networks like Facebook are all about who you know, they tend to be obsessed with authenticated identities. From its roots on elite college campuses, accepting only users with .edu email addresses, Facebook has had a “real name policy,” which allows the site to remove the accounts of users who are using pseudonyms, arguing that online behavior is better when people are required to own their words. Google has followed suit, urging users to use real names on Google Plus and on YouTube. (These policies have raised questions from the human rights community, which points out that activists using online tools have valid reasons to conceal their identities, as do youth exploring sensitive questions around gender and sexuality.)

Reddit, by contrast, doesn’t care who you are or who you know offline. Reddit names are unconnected to real-world identities and it’s commonplace for users to create “throwaway” accounts to reveal sensitive information. In this sense, Reddit is more like the pre-social media Internet, when a New Yorker cartoonist could reasonably joke “On the Internet, no one knows you’re a dog.”

Read more. [Image: Reddit, by way of Facebook (Facebook.com)]

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    YET THEY STILL ALLOW FIREARMS TO BE BOUGHT AND SOLD ON THE SITE
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