July 11, 2013
I Hated The Newsroom’s First Season—and Can’t Wait to See the Second One

When The Newsroom premiered last year, I was sitting in a living room filled with friends, all excitedly talking about what this new Aaron Sorkin show would be. The promos had Will McAvoy, played by golden-retriever lookalike Jeff Daniels, sitting behind his anchor’s desk seeming both pensive and conflicted in the way that Sorkin likes his heroes to seem. So the group could assess a few things: We would be following a newscaster who, while maybe morally bankrupt in his personal life, is a man of character and social responsibility behind that desk. One could only assume that he would have a complicated office relationship with a brilliant but difficult woman because, well, it’s Sorkin.
The series opens on a liberal-conservative debate with our hero McAvoy sandwiched in the middle. He’s bored by the predictable argument between the two sides from the not-too-distant past. If you think Obama is a socialist then Reagan was too, and so on. Our hero has had enough. Temple rub. Bridge-of-the-nose squeeze. The moderator points at McAvoy and says, “I want a human moment from you.” Then we get a vision of a concerned Emily Mortimer in the audience, and then McAvoy is yelling at a blonde undergrad as to why America is not the greatest country in the world.
Read more. [Image: HBO]

I Hated The Newsroom’s First Season—and Can’t Wait to See the Second One

When The Newsroom premiered last year, I was sitting in a living room filled with friends, all excitedly talking about what this new Aaron Sorkin show would be. The promos had Will McAvoy, played by golden-retriever lookalike Jeff Daniels, sitting behind his anchor’s desk seeming both pensive and conflicted in the way that Sorkin likes his heroes to seem. So the group could assess a few things: We would be following a newscaster who, while maybe morally bankrupt in his personal life, is a man of character and social responsibility behind that desk. One could only assume that he would have a complicated office relationship with a brilliant but difficult woman because, well, it’s Sorkin.

The series opens on a liberal-conservative debate with our hero McAvoy sandwiched in the middle. He’s bored by the predictable argument between the two sides from the not-too-distant past. If you think Obama is a socialist then Reagan was too, and so on. Our hero has had enough. Temple rub. Bridge-of-the-nose squeeze. The moderator points at McAvoy and says, “I want a human moment from you.” Then we get a vision of a concerned Emily Mortimer in the audience, and then McAvoy is yelling at a blonde undergrad as to why America is not the greatest country in the world.

Read more. [Image: HBO]

  1. anindiscriminatecollection reblogged this from theatlantic
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  4. sotheresthat reblogged this from meredithbklyn and added:
    This article is great overall, but this line is by far my favorite: Don’t get me wrong, Sorkin can write romance. The...
  5. meredithbklyn reblogged this from theatlantic
  6. reblythe reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    Yup…
  7. sylvia-grey reblogged this from theatlantic
  8. ellobofilipino reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    Just a couple more days to go…
  9. franklinmarshall reblogged this from theatlantic
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  11. reymundosonfire reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    Dude this person gets it! Everything they’re saying is what I feel about this show
  12. brianschumacher reblogged this from theatlantic
  13. houseoforange said: I’m excited!