July 11, 2013
I Hated The Newsroom’s First Season—and Can’t Wait to See the Second One

When The Newsroom premiered last year, I was sitting in a living room filled with friends, all excitedly talking about what this new Aaron Sorkin show would be. The promos had Will McAvoy, played by golden-retriever lookalike Jeff Daniels, sitting behind his anchor’s desk seeming both pensive and conflicted in the way that Sorkin likes his heroes to seem. So the group could assess a few things: We would be following a newscaster who, while maybe morally bankrupt in his personal life, is a man of character and social responsibility behind that desk. One could only assume that he would have a complicated office relationship with a brilliant but difficult woman because, well, it’s Sorkin.
The series opens on a liberal-conservative debate with our hero McAvoy sandwiched in the middle. He’s bored by the predictable argument between the two sides from the not-too-distant past. If you think Obama is a socialist then Reagan was too, and so on. Our hero has had enough. Temple rub. Bridge-of-the-nose squeeze. The moderator points at McAvoy and says, “I want a human moment from you.” Then we get a vision of a concerned Emily Mortimer in the audience, and then McAvoy is yelling at a blonde undergrad as to why America is not the greatest country in the world.
Read more. [Image: HBO]

I Hated The Newsroom’s First Season—and Can’t Wait to See the Second One

When The Newsroom premiered last year, I was sitting in a living room filled with friends, all excitedly talking about what this new Aaron Sorkin show would be. The promos had Will McAvoy, played by golden-retriever lookalike Jeff Daniels, sitting behind his anchor’s desk seeming both pensive and conflicted in the way that Sorkin likes his heroes to seem. So the group could assess a few things: We would be following a newscaster who, while maybe morally bankrupt in his personal life, is a man of character and social responsibility behind that desk. One could only assume that he would have a complicated office relationship with a brilliant but difficult woman because, well, it’s Sorkin.

The series opens on a liberal-conservative debate with our hero McAvoy sandwiched in the middle. He’s bored by the predictable argument between the two sides from the not-too-distant past. If you think Obama is a socialist then Reagan was too, and so on. Our hero has had enough. Temple rub. Bridge-of-the-nose squeeze. The moderator points at McAvoy and says, “I want a human moment from you.” Then we get a vision of a concerned Emily Mortimer in the audience, and then McAvoy is yelling at a blonde undergrad as to why America is not the greatest country in the world.

Read more. [Image: HBO]

  1. anindiscriminatecollection reblogged this from theatlantic
  2. are-we-dreaming reblogged this from theatlantic
  3. kdbp reblogged this from ellobofilipino
  4. sotheresthat reblogged this from meredithbklyn and added:
    This article is great overall, but this line is by far my favorite: Don’t get me wrong, Sorkin can write romance. The...
  5. meredithbklyn reblogged this from theatlantic
  6. reblythe reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    Yup…
  7. sylvia-grey reblogged this from theatlantic
  8. franklinmarshall reblogged this from theatlantic
  9. witenoyze reblogged this from theatlantic
  10. alegriasmuse reblogged this from theatlantic
  11. reymundosonfire reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    Dude this person gets it! Everything they’re saying is what I feel about this show
  12. brianschumacher reblogged this from theatlantic