July 12, 2013
The Zimmerman Trial and the Meaning of Verdicts

In every “trial of the century” (and each year seems to produce a few), the national news media waits for “the verdict.” It is the culmination of the energies of the lawyers, the court, and the observers and can be the most anticipated moment in a case. This frenzy of anticipation has now turned toward the jury in the George Zimmerman murder trial in Sanford, Florida.
Criminal trials generate dramatic tension. Lawyers battle witness by witness, argument by argument, to convince a jury of the rightness of their cause. For the parties not privy to the deliberations in the jury room, there is no more heart-stopping moment than the announcement of the verdict. The foreperson stands up. A hush fills the room. Usually, jurors keep their facial expressions impassive, although occasionally a smile or tear betrays them. Then the judge turns to the foreperson and asks, “Has the jury reached a verdict?” When the foreperson responds, “Yes,” everything stops and all eyes turn toward the jury.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

The Zimmerman Trial and the Meaning of Verdicts

In every “trial of the century” (and each year seems to produce a few), the national news media waits for “the verdict.” It is the culmination of the energies of the lawyers, the court, and the observers and can be the most anticipated moment in a case. This frenzy of anticipation has now turned toward the jury in the George Zimmerman murder trial in Sanford, Florida.

Criminal trials generate dramatic tension. Lawyers battle witness by witness, argument by argument, to convince a jury of the rightness of their cause. For the parties not privy to the deliberations in the jury room, there is no more heart-stopping moment than the announcement of the verdict. The foreperson stands up. A hush fills the room. Usually, jurors keep their facial expressions impassive, although occasionally a smile or tear betrays them. Then the judge turns to the foreperson and asks, “Has the jury reached a verdict?” When the foreperson responds, “Yes,” everything stops and all eyes turn toward the jury.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

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    This is a patronizing article. Zimmerman is guilty by his own admission, and it looks likely that justice will not be...
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  15. sarahbsayshello reblogged this from owlpacino and added:
    THIS TRIAL BOTHERS ME SO MUCH. How can you “stand your ground” on public property, while following someone? Stalking...
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    “The verdict is the final answer—a resolution to the problem that shattered the community order. It represents the...
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