July 12, 2013
Do Women Make Better Senators Than Men?

Five women are gathered around the dining-room table from Sen. Barbara Mikulski’s childhood home. It’s the centerpiece of her hideaway, an unmarked retreat in the U.S. Capitol, and, like the hideaway itself, it’s a symbol of the distance all of them have traveled. The shelves and walls display testaments to Mikulski’s long career: photographs, clippings, replicas of the space shuttle. One highlight is a picture of “Buckboard Barb” Mikulski in a cowboy hat and colorful Mexican-style vest, standing with former Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison during a visit to Texas. Another is a series of photos that starts with two women and ends with 20, a visual display that is striking less for its drama than for its incrementalism. The modern history of women in the Senate is one of slow, hard-fought gains across three decades that have at last given them real clout — or perhaps we should say the potential for real clout, since they serve in a Congress famous for gridlock, not accomplishments.
"This room, probably when Barbara Mikulski came in, was one of those rooms where there were cigars and a bunch of guys," Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., said during a recent discussion in the hideaway.
And now? “No cigars,” said Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine.
"No cigars and a lot of hardworking women," agreed Murray.
Read more. [Image: Chet Susslin/National Journal]

Do Women Make Better Senators Than Men?

Five women are gathered around the dining-room table from Sen. Barbara Mikulski’s childhood home. It’s the centerpiece of her hideaway, an unmarked retreat in the U.S. Capitol, and, like the hideaway itself, it’s a symbol of the distance all of them have traveled. The shelves and walls display testaments to Mikulski’s long career: photographs, clippings, replicas of the space shuttle. One highlight is a picture of “Buckboard Barb” Mikulski in a cowboy hat and colorful Mexican-style vest, standing with former Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison during a visit to Texas. Another is a series of photos that starts with two women and ends with 20, a visual display that is striking less for its drama than for its incrementalism. The modern history of women in the Senate is one of slow, hard-fought gains across three decades that have at last given them real clout — or perhaps we should say the potential for real clout, since they serve in a Congress famous for gridlock, not accomplishments.

"This room, probably when Barbara Mikulski came in, was one of those rooms where there were cigars and a bunch of guys," Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., said during a recent discussion in the hideaway.

And now? “No cigars,” said Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine.

"No cigars and a lot of hardworking women," agreed Murray.

Read more. [Image: Chet Susslin/National Journal]

3:55pm
  
Filed under: Politics Longreads Women Congress 
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  5. biggerbrighterbetter said: yes
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  16. taylorgrayskull reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    let’s make more lady Senators happen!
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  19. houseoforange said: Yes, lol