July 15, 2013
On Getting Drunk in Antarctica

There comes a point every summer where the hot weather starts to feel less like an opportunity for outdoor fun and more like a full-body rash that won’t go away. New Yorkers are flocking  to an ice bar. Japanese workers ditch their suits for Hawaiian shirts. Here in D.C., the summer is so swamp-like that when you go outside — even when it’s not raining — people tell you to stay dry.
So naturally, when I learned about Phil Broughton, a health physicist who once worked at the Amundsen Scott South Pole Station in Antarctica, I was drawn as much by the frigid setting as I was by his amazing story.
This time of year, when days in the northern hemisphere are long and sweltering, those near the South Pole reach lows of -100 degrees Fahrenheit or less, and the continent is in the throes of its yearly six months of darkness.
Each winter, the few dozen workers at the South Pole research station spend nine months in total isolation: No airplanes can fly in or out until the base “warms” up to 50 below zero — otherwise the fuel might freeze and kill the engine.
Read more. [Image: National Science Foundation/Sven Lidstrom]

On Getting Drunk in Antarctica

There comes a point every summer where the hot weather starts to feel less like an opportunity for outdoor fun and more like a full-body rash that won’t go away. New Yorkers are flocking to an ice bar. Japanese workers ditch their suits for Hawaiian shirts. Here in D.C., the summer is so swamp-like that when you go outside — even when it’s not raining — people tell you to stay dry.

So naturally, when I learned about Phil Broughton, a health physicist who once worked at the Amundsen Scott South Pole Station in Antarctica, I was drawn as much by the frigid setting as I was by his amazing story.

This time of year, when days in the northern hemisphere are long and sweltering, those near the South Pole reach lows of -100 degrees Fahrenheit or less, and the continent is in the throes of its yearly six months of darkness.

Each winter, the few dozen workers at the South Pole research station spend nine months in total isolation: No airplanes can fly in or out until the base “warms” up to 50 below zero — otherwise the fuel might freeze and kill the engine.

Read more. [Image: National Science Foundation/Sven Lidstrom]

2:15pm
  
Filed under: Antarctica Drinking 
  1. isthisthe-u-n reblogged this from metalmurmaid
  2. metalmurmaid reblogged this from theatlantic
  3. explosivemarbles reblogged this from victrazing
  4. mischief-dream reblogged this from theatlantic
  5. lemyh reblogged this from victrazing
  6. spngewrthy reblogged this from kylegreggy
  7. zeenphotos reblogged this from theatlantic
  8. kylegreggy reblogged this from theatlantic
  9. newsworks reblogged this from theatlantic
  10. cobwebshuntmyattic reblogged this from theatlantic
  11. digidotbot reblogged this from theatlantic
  12. clockworoks reblogged this from tommby
  13. tommby reblogged this from theatlantic
  14. icicle reblogged this from d-d-d
  15. wetjewels reblogged this from theatlantic
  16. sliverdemon reblogged this from maneatingbadger
  17. sosungjackskellington reblogged this from theatlantic
  18. sensiblestupidity reblogged this from maneatingbadger
  19. maneatingbadger reblogged this from theatlantic
  20. wdmsy reblogged this from d-d-d
  21. suchaplaceneverwas reblogged this from backshootingford
  22. votredilettante reblogged this from theatlantic
  23. wwbioteach reblogged this from mb24jg
  24. backshootingford reblogged this from theatlantic