August 9, 2013
Why We Can’t Count on the Test-Tube Burger to Solve World Hunger

Lab-grown meat is obviously an incredible development. If produced on a wide scale, it could greatly cut the environmental impact of raising livestock. It could help us funnel the grains we currently feed cattle toward other uses. And yes, it provides a way for animal-ethics people to better enjoy barbeques.
But we have to be careful when we talk about amazing food technologies as being a way to help “hunger” or a “hungry population,” and not just because this burger currently costs $330,000 to produce and  might not be commercially available  to consumers for decades.
About 12.5 percent of the world’s population is considered “hungry,” but many development economists say we already grow enough food to feed them all.
It’s true that as people get richer and populations continue to grow, more people will demand meat, and lab-grown meat could be one way to provide it to them without raising more cows. But most actual hunger that people experience, sustainability experts believe, is not because of a lack of food in the world — lab-grown or otherwise — but rather the result of a complicated mix of poverty, natural disasters, theft, or poor land use.
And while petri-dish burgers might help the situation by bringing attention to the “hunger” issue, they probably aren’t going to solve it in the long run.
Read more.

Why We Can’t Count on the Test-Tube Burger to Solve World Hunger

Lab-grown meat is obviously an incredible development. If produced on a wide scale, it could greatly cut the environmental impact of raising livestock. It could help us funnel the grains we currently feed cattle toward other uses. And yes, it provides a way for animal-ethics people to better enjoy barbeques.

But we have to be careful when we talk about amazing food technologies as being a way to help “hunger” or a “hungry population,” and not just because this burger currently costs $330,000 to produce and might not be commercially available to consumers for decades.

About 12.5 percent of the world’s population is considered “hungry,” but many development economists say we already grow enough food to feed them all.

It’s true that as people get richer and populations continue to grow, more people will demand meat, and lab-grown meat could be one way to provide it to them without raising more cows. But most actual hunger that people experience, sustainability experts believe, is not because of a lack of food in the world — lab-grown or otherwise — but rather the result of a complicated mix of poverty, natural disasters, theft, or poor land use.

And while petri-dish burgers might help the situation by bringing attention to the “hunger” issue, they probably aren’t going to solve it in the long run.

Read more.

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    As stated on an earlier show, what’s next, a cloned cow body on blocks in a restaurant meat fridge we can just carve...
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