August 14, 2013
Growing Up with Stop-and-Frisk

Jamal Richards of Brownsville, Brooklyn could have been a poster child for the regime of fear that stop-and-frisk created in minority neighborhoods during the past decade. In his early teens, Jamal was stopped four or five times a week. “24/7, 365. That’s a lot of stops, you do the math,” he said.
The Brownsville police, defending the tactic for getting guns off the streets, called it “collateral damage” or “being in the wrong place at the wrong time,” as officer Leonard Dyce put it.
This is stop-and-frisk central. For every 100 residents, police make 93 stops, more than 15 times as many as in New York City in general. Under Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Police Commissioner Raymond W. Kelly the stop-and-frisk program expanded 500 percent, stopping 533,042 people in 2012 compared to 97,296 in 2002. Of more than five million people stopped in New York City during that decade, 4.3 million were black or Hispanic. Nearly 90 percent of those being stopped are released without a summons or an arrest.
Earlier this week, a federal judge ruled NYPD’s stop-and-frisk tactics unconstitutional in the landmark class-action trial Floyd vs. the City of New York, stating that officers conducted indirect racial profiling, disproportionately and illegally targeting blacks and Hispanics who wouldn’t be stopped had they been white.
Read more. [Image: Eric Thayer/Reuters]

Growing Up with Stop-and-Frisk

Jamal Richards of Brownsville, Brooklyn could have been a poster child for the regime of fear that stop-and-frisk created in minority neighborhoods during the past decade. In his early teens, Jamal was stopped four or five times a week. “24/7, 365. That’s a lot of stops, you do the math,” he said.

The Brownsville police, defending the tactic for getting guns off the streets, called it “collateral damage” or “being in the wrong place at the wrong time,” as officer Leonard Dyce put it.

This is stop-and-frisk central. For every 100 residents, police make 93 stops, more than 15 times as many as in New York City in general. Under Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Police Commissioner Raymond W. Kelly the stop-and-frisk program expanded 500 percent, stopping 533,042 people in 2012 compared to 97,296 in 2002. Of more than five million people stopped in New York City during that decade, 4.3 million were black or Hispanic. Nearly 90 percent of those being stopped are released without a summons or an arrest.

Earlier this week, a federal judge ruled NYPD’s stop-and-frisk tactics unconstitutional in the landmark class-action trial Floyd vs. the City of New York, stating that officers conducted indirect racial profiling, disproportionately and illegally targeting blacks and Hispanics who wouldn’t be stopped had they been white.

Read more. [Image: Eric Thayer/Reuters]

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