August 16, 2013
The Muslim Brotherhood’s Fall Lands Turkey an Unexpected Ally: Kurds

Today, Turkey and Egypt recalled their ambassadors from each other’s capitol, signaling a major downturn in bilateral ties. At the same time, Turkey’s influence in Cairo seems to be winding down.
Indeed, Turkey’s ambitious drive to become a Middle East power by influencing the region’s Muslim Brotherhood-inspired parties appears to have been upended. The Brotherhood has fallen from government in Egypt, failed to elect its candidate to lead the Syrian opposition, and has been sidelined in Libya. Qatar, which had hitherto allied itself with Ankara to fund MB-style parties, appears to be changing its heart after an unexpected change in leadership.
With the MB clinging to power only in remote Tunisia, Ankara has turned to an unexpected Middle East ally: Kurds, an ethnic group the Turkish government has historically been at odds with. Turkey’s goal this time, though, is not to shape the region, but simply to shield itself from massive Middle East instability.
Read more. [Image: Azad Lashkari/Reuters]

The Muslim Brotherhood’s Fall Lands Turkey an Unexpected Ally: Kurds

Today, Turkey and Egypt recalled their ambassadors from each other’s capitol, signaling a major downturn in bilateral ties. At the same time, Turkey’s influence in Cairo seems to be winding down.

Indeed, Turkey’s ambitious drive to become a Middle East power by influencing the region’s Muslim Brotherhood-inspired parties appears to have been upended. The Brotherhood has fallen from government in Egypt, failed to elect its candidate to lead the Syrian opposition, and has been sidelined in Libya. Qatar, which had hitherto allied itself with Ankara to fund MB-style parties, appears to be changing its heart after an unexpected change in leadership.

With the MB clinging to power only in remote Tunisia, Ankara has turned to an unexpected Middle East ally: Kurds, an ethnic group the Turkish government has historically been at odds with. Turkey’s goal this time, though, is not to shape the region, but simply to shield itself from massive Middle East instability.

Read more. [Image: Azad Lashkari/Reuters]

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    Hayalperest insanlar,artık silahlarla ülke kurulamayacağını kim öğretecek bunlara?
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    Rischio “contagio”
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    How war in the arab countries could bring peace in the turkish sphere. Wow :-/
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    Lan ARKADASLAR BAKİN ALİN Bİ OKUYUN
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    Buymuş knklar -,-
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