August 20, 2013
There Are No More Good Guys in Egypt

Almost a thousand people dead, dozens of churches burnt, its capital’s most affluent districts subjected to raging firefights: Even in a region all too accustomed to conflicts of unrelenting savagery, Egypt’s past week has stood out.
It wasn’t meant to be like this, of course.
The last time this many foreign journalists decamped to Cairo, they witnessed millions clamoring for the overthrow of former President Hosni Mubarak’s authoritarian regime.
But Tahrir Square, the epicenter of the revolutionaries’ efforts, is blocked off now, with tanks, armored personnel carriers, and double coils of rusty barbed wire strung across its approach roads. It’s an apt metaphor for Egypt’s withered revolution.
Last time, we, the West, had a dog in the fight. We rooted passionately for the beleaguered masses battling the brutal police state, cheering their demands for “bread, freedom, and social justice” and interpreting their triumph as evidence of democracy’s irresistible allure.
This time, however, we have no one to root for.
Read more. [Image: Amr Abdallah Dalsh/Reuters]

There Are No More Good Guys in Egypt

Almost a thousand people dead, dozens of churches burnt, its capital’s most affluent districts subjected to raging firefights: Even in a region all too accustomed to conflicts of unrelenting savagery, Egypt’s past week has stood out.

It wasn’t meant to be like this, of course.

The last time this many foreign journalists decamped to Cairo, they witnessed millions clamoring for the overthrow of former President Hosni Mubarak’s authoritarian regime.

But Tahrir Square, the epicenter of the revolutionaries’ efforts, is blocked off now, with tanks, armored personnel carriers, and double coils of rusty barbed wire strung across its approach roads. It’s an apt metaphor for Egypt’s withered revolution.

Last time, we, the West, had a dog in the fight. We rooted passionately for the beleaguered masses battling the brutal police state, cheering their demands for “bread, freedom, and social justice” and interpreting their triumph as evidence of democracy’s irresistible allure.

This time, however, we have no one to root for.

Read more. [Image: Amr Abdallah Dalsh/Reuters]

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    There Are No More Good Guys in Egypt
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    Why should we be rooting for anyone what kinda racist imperialist bullshit is that? This is real life not some fucking...
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