September 11, 2013
Gone Home: A Brilliant Example of How Less Can Be More in Video Games

Common gamer wisdom says that in order to achieve maturity, realism, and thematic complexity in video games, developers have to add cutting-edge technology: vivid graphics, plausibly animated characters, advanced systems of artificial intelligence. So the notion that a sophisticated story experience is best attained not by marching forward technologically but through restraint and good design is somewhat radical.
Yet that’s exactly what the four-person Fullbright Company set out to prove with Gone Home, a new PC release that’s being widely lauded as one of the best storytelling games in some time. It does a few remarkable, even brave things, thematically—like exploring the relationship of two teenage girls in love, and focusing only on a troubled family. But what makes Gone Home a special achievement among games, though, is all the things it doesn’t do. Many developers have longed to incorporate literary storytelling elements into video games for a while now—but they often stick to the formulas of commercial action thrillers anyway. Gone Home represents a necessary shift in focus, and it does so in a no-frills way that other video-game developers would be wise to take note of.
Read more. [Image: Fullbright Company]

Gone Home: A Brilliant Example of How Less Can Be More in Video Games

Common gamer wisdom says that in order to achieve maturity, realism, and thematic complexity in video games, developers have to add cutting-edge technology: vivid graphics, plausibly animated characters, advanced systems of artificial intelligence. So the notion that a sophisticated story experience is best attained not by marching forward technologically but through restraint and good design is somewhat radical.

Yet that’s exactly what the four-person Fullbright Company set out to prove with Gone Home, a new PC release that’s being widely lauded as one of the best storytelling games in some time. It does a few remarkable, even brave things, thematically—like exploring the relationship of two teenage girls in love, and focusing only on a troubled family. But what makes Gone Home a special achievement among games, though, is all the things it doesn’t do. Many developers have longed to incorporate literary storytelling elements into video games for a while now—but they often stick to the formulas of commercial action thrillers anyway. Gone Home represents a necessary shift in focus, and it does so in a no-frills way that other video-game developers would be wise to take note of.

Read more. [Image: Fullbright Company]

7:35pm
  
Filed under: Video Games Gone Home Gaming 
  1. autopilotfootprints reblogged this from sliding-on-triangles
  2. jednozycie reblogged this from sailorshepard
  3. sailorshepard reblogged this from theatlantic
  4. fleur2prunier reblogged this from theatlantic
  5. kcdahippie reblogged this from braixxen
  6. pckelly reblogged this from braixxen and added:
    I just watched a run through of it, (I wouldn’t do this if you want to play the game, it’s gonna ruin all of it for...
  7. braixxen reblogged this from zeldran and added:
    I gotta play this one day.
  8. zeldran reblogged this from stanleycutebrick and added:
    It’s gonna be like $5 on steam sometime during the sale. It’s really good.
  9. stanleycutebrick reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    seriously. go everyone needs to buy this game. right now.
  10. kirathenytmare reblogged this from thepoweroftheatom
  11. thepoweroftheatom reblogged this from theatlantic
  12. qraccoon reblogged this from genderfluidloki
  13. alaquestiqueveliquinate reblogged this from genderfluidloki
  14. genderfluidloki reblogged this from theatlantic
  15. almost-dead-battlefront reblogged this from theatlantic
  16. naldorah reblogged this from theatlantic
  17. commspecialist reblogged this from hermione
  18. lazyjabbur reblogged this from emilyisobsessed