September 13, 2013
How to Make School Better for Boys

I recently appeared on MSNBC’s The Cycle to discuss the new edition of my book The War Against Boys. The four hosts were having none of it. A war on boys? They countered with the wage gap and the prominence of men across the professions. One of them concluded, “I don’t think the patriarchy is under any threat.”
The MSNBC skeptics are hardly alone in dismissing the plight of boys and young men. Even those who acknowledge that boys are losing in school argue that they’re winning in life. But the facts are otherwise. American boys across the ability spectrum are struggling in the nation’s schools, with teachers and administrators failing to engage their specific interests and needs. This neglect has ominous implications not only for the boy’s social and intellectual development but for the national economy, as policy analysts are just beginning to calculate.
As the United States moves toward a knowledge-based economy, school achievement has become the cornerstone of lifelong success. Women are adapting; men are not. Yet the education establishment and federal government are, with some notable exceptions, looking the other way.
Read more. [Image: pawpaw67/flickr]

How to Make School Better for Boys

I recently appeared on MSNBC’s The Cycle to discuss the new edition of my book The War Against Boys. The four hosts were having none of it. A war on boys? They countered with the wage gap and the prominence of men across the professions. One of them concluded, “I don’t think the patriarchy is under any threat.”

The MSNBC skeptics are hardly alone in dismissing the plight of boys and young men. Even those who acknowledge that boys are losing in school argue that they’re winning in life. But the facts are otherwise. American boys across the ability spectrum are struggling in the nation’s schools, with teachers and administrators failing to engage their specific interests and needs. This neglect has ominous implications not only for the boy’s social and intellectual development but for the national economy, as policy analysts are just beginning to calculate.

As the United States moves toward a knowledge-based economy, school achievement has become the cornerstone of lifelong success. Women are adapting; men are not. Yet the education establishment and federal government are, with some notable exceptions, looking the other way.

Read more. [Image: pawpaw67/flickr]

  1. rownowaga reblogged this from theatlantic
  2. danimoonstarr reblogged this from chicagoartnerd
  3. chicagoartnerd reblogged this from knitmeapony
  4. ergoincognito reblogged this from vampirerevenant
  5. ardonye reblogged this from jeremy-ruiner
  6. journeyofanewteacher reblogged this from theatlantic
  7. echo6979 reblogged this from barefootdramaturg and added:
    Oh, ffs
  8. alot-of-kiwi reblogged this from amooseintransition
  9. mferry79b reblogged this from theatlantic
  10. thecollegeconcern reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    Is it still the “achievement gap?”
  11. approximatelygod reblogged this from gingerdean
  12. nemuriouji reblogged this from ofpeachesandpears
  13. sora-power reblogged this from barefootdramaturg
  14. glow-worm-chronicles reblogged this from seananmcguire
  15. bcrebel reblogged this from lieutenant-piecewise
  16. gingerdean reblogged this from brassmama
  17. ramonadm reblogged this from theatlantic
  18. waywren reblogged this from seananmcguire
  19. plaidteachings reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    Really interesting. I’m concerned about how to reach the boys in the classroom but I’ll have to read this later because...
  20. papieretlechiffon reblogged this from thewashingtontoast and added:
    Boys and men have a hard time because they’re stupid and aggressive and have been taught to be stupid and aggressive and...
  21. vassalorde reblogged this from brassmama
  22. brassmama reblogged this from grumpyslytherin
  23. technicoloured reblogged this from ofpeachesandpears
  24. grumpyslytherin reblogged this from rocketwalker
  25. wanahouston reblogged this from theatlantic