September 19, 2013
What Is iTunes? The 56 Things Apple’s Behemoth Does

The release of iOS 7, the software that powers iPhones and iPads, wasn’t the only major update from Apple yesterday. The company also released iTunes Radio, a Pandora-like feature which will play a stream of music inspired by a given song, artist, or album. 
Which got me thinking: What is iTunes? The software dates back to 1999, when it was conceived by two independent Mac developers as Soundjam MP. Apple secretly purchased and adapted Soundjam, then released it as “the world’s best and easiest to use ‘jukebox’ software” on January 9, 2001. Since then, the software has been made to sync with iPods, released for Windows, and turned into the iPhone’s and iPad’s central connection to the computer. 
Apple’s desktop operating system, Mac OS, is built on UNIX code. UNIX is an old, open-source technology, and it carries certain ideals and traditions. Early UNIX programmers developed a philosophy for the system, a preferred method of writing software. One of its tenets? “Make each program do one thing well,” wrote a UNIX pioneer, Doug McIlroy. “To do a new job, build afresh rather than complicate old programs by adding new features.”
Read more.

What Is iTunes? The 56 Things Apple’s Behemoth Does

The release of iOS 7, the software that powers iPhones and iPads, wasn’t the only major update from Apple yesterday. The company also released iTunes Radio, a Pandora-like feature which will play a stream of music inspired by a given song, artist, or album. 

Which got me thinking: What is iTunes? The software dates back to 1999, when it was conceived by two independent Mac developers as Soundjam MP. Apple secretly purchased and adapted Soundjam, then released it as “the world’s best and easiest to use ‘jukebox’ software” on January 9, 2001. Since then, the software has been made to sync with iPods, released for Windows, and turned into the iPhone’s and iPad’s central connection to the computer. 

Apple’s desktop operating system, Mac OS, is built on UNIX code. UNIX is an old, open-source technology, and it carries certain ideals and traditions. Early UNIX programmers developed a philosophy for the system, a preferred method of writing software. One of its tenets? “Make each program do one thing well,” wrote a UNIX pioneer, Doug McIlroy. “To do a new job, build afresh rather than complicate old programs by adding new features.”

Read more.

4:25pm
  
Filed under: Technology Apple iTunes Tech iOS7 
  1. fatlossunveiled reblogged this from theatlantic
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  4. dsjutah reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    Interesting
  5. bethanysworld reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    And right now? When you shuffle? Don’t even think about going to the previous song. Is it a glitch? If so, it needs to...
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