September 23, 2013
The Difficulty of Defining Television Comedy in 2013

Enlightened fans are accustomed to never getting what they want. Critics championed the HBO series, which starred Laura Dern as an earnest idealist rebuilding her life following a rehab stint, but the show’s devoted disciples never recruited a sizable flock of fellow viewers. Consequently, despite the impassioned pleas and online campaigns, the show got the ax in March after two seasons. So when Dern received an Emmy nomination for outstanding lead actress in a comedy series this year, it felt a consolation prize. Enlightened may have been a common should-win pick in Emmy preview columns, but few observers actually predicted a win for Dern last night. (They were correct: Dern lost to Julia Louis-Dreyfus as Veep’s acerbic Selina Meyer.)
One of the narratives surrounding Enlightened—besides how audiences missed out on creator Mike White’s brilliant writing (evident in the show’s haunting, existential monologues)—was that it never truly fit the comedy label thrust upon it, perhaps in ways in ways that hurt its chances of survival. Yes, viewers were supposed to sympathize with Dern’s earnest but deluded Amy Jellicoe, but were they also reveling in shadenfreude? In the first season, Amy was that girl in the office: After seeking treatment following a humiliating workplace breakdown, Amy was totally absorbed in her new-age philosophy and completely lacking in self-awareness in ways that could be tremendously funny. But there was also a kind of sadness in her obliviousness, an admirable optimism in her search for purpose, and a vulnerability in her healing process that all resonated despite her flaws. This was especially true in the more plot-driven second season, when Amy decided to become a corporate whistleblower following another office humiliation. The layers of Amy felt less and less comedic as the show went on, but the way Dern pulled them off was still an award-worthy feat.
Read more.

The Difficulty of Defining Television Comedy in 2013

Enlightened fans are accustomed to never getting what they want. Critics championed the HBO series, which starred Laura Dern as an earnest idealist rebuilding her life following a rehab stint, but the show’s devoted disciples never recruited a sizable flock of fellow viewers. Consequently, despite the impassioned pleas and online campaigns, the show got the ax in March after two seasons. So when Dern received an Emmy nomination for outstanding lead actress in a comedy series this year, it felt a consolation prize. Enlightened may have been a common should-win pick in Emmy preview columns, but few observers actually predicted a win for Dern last night. (They were correct: Dern lost to Julia Louis-Dreyfus as Veep’s acerbic Selina Meyer.)

One of the narratives surrounding Enlightened—besides how audiences missed out on creator Mike White’s brilliant writing (evident in the show’s haunting, existential monologues)—was that it never truly fit the comedy label thrust upon it, perhaps in ways in ways that hurt its chances of survival. Yes, viewers were supposed to sympathize with Dern’s earnest but deluded Amy Jellicoe, but were they also reveling in shadenfreude? In the first season, Amy was that girl in the office: After seeking treatment following a humiliating workplace breakdown, Amy was totally absorbed in her new-age philosophy and completely lacking in self-awareness in ways that could be tremendously funny. But there was also a kind of sadness in her obliviousness, an admirable optimism in her search for purpose, and a vulnerability in her healing process that all resonated despite her flaws. This was especially true in the more plot-driven second season, when Amy decided to become a corporate whistleblower following another office humiliation. The layers of Amy felt less and less comedic as the show went on, but the way Dern pulled them off was still an award-worthy feat.

Read more.

9:35pm
  
Filed under: Television Comedy Enlightened Veep 
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    Post-modern comedy!
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    The Difficulty of Defining Television Comedy in 2013 Enlightened fans are accustomed to never getting what they want....
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  15. houseoforange said: Saved to read for later!
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