September 26, 2013
Violence in Chicago: A Tale of Two Cities

After hearing about the Chicago shooting last week in which 13 were injured in Cornell Square Park, including a three-year-old, I and writer Mikki Kendall, both Chicago residents, had very different reactions.  It’s “not just the park incident,” Kendall told me by email. “20 people were shot this weekend. People are being shot almost daily. And I have a 14 year-old son who can’t go to the McDonald’s in Hyde Park at lunch because the school has noticed an uptick in crime at that location.”
I was depressed and horrified, too — but depressed and horrified in the way that you are when you hear about gun violence anywhere. Unlike Kendall, I wasn’t directly concerned about the safety of my family.
Based on our reactions, you’d think that Kendall lived much closer to the shooting than I do. But that’s not the case. In fact, we’re both in Hyde Park, about 4 miles away from where it occurred on the city’s South Side. I can walk to the McDonald’s she mentioned.
So why does Kendall feel personally targeted and I don’t? Well, Kendall is black and grew up here; I’m white, and didn’t.
In other words, welcome to Chicago, where segregation is almost a civic art form.
Read more. [Image: stopchicago.org]

Violence in Chicago: A Tale of Two Cities

After hearing about the Chicago shooting last week in which 13 were injured in Cornell Square Park, including a three-year-old, I and writer Mikki Kendall, both Chicago residents, had very different reactions.  It’s “not just the park incident,” Kendall told me by email. “20 people were shot this weekend. People are being shot almost daily. And I have a 14 year-old son who can’t go to the McDonald’s in Hyde Park at lunch because the school has noticed an uptick in crime at that location.”

I was depressed and horrified, too — but depressed and horrified in the way that you are when you hear about gun violence anywhere. Unlike Kendall, I wasn’t directly concerned about the safety of my family.

Based on our reactions, you’d think that Kendall lived much closer to the shooting than I do. But that’s not the case. In fact, we’re both in Hyde Park, about 4 miles away from where it occurred on the city’s South Side. I can walk to the McDonald’s she mentioned.

So why does Kendall feel personally targeted and I don’t? Well, Kendall is black and grew up here; I’m white, and didn’t.

In other words, welcome to Chicago, where segregation is almost a civic art form.

Read more. [Image: stopchicago.org]

  1. anindiscriminatecollection reblogged this from theatlantic
  2. casapazzo reblogged this from theatlantic
  3. advocrater reblogged this from theatlantic
  4. backrowheckling reblogged this from gapers
  5. dearaudreyjune reblogged this from theatlantic
  6. janetor reblogged this from theatlantic
  7. backyardgoldmine reblogged this from gapers
  8. mahfablife reblogged this from theatlantic
  9. luxuryfashionfanatics reblogged this from theatlantic
  10. jacalle9 reblogged this from theatlantic
  11. snowbirdinpassing reblogged this from theatlantic
  12. awkwardthemusical reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    my city. well said.
  13. kammartinez reblogged this from theatlantic
  14. we-aredone reblogged this from openup-your-mind
  15. openup-your-mind reblogged this from dendroica
  16. is-wooden reblogged this from dendroica
  17. silas216 reblogged this from theatlantic
  18. ayoretofficial reblogged this from theatlantic
  19. gapers reblogged this from theatlantic
  20. classring52 reblogged this from theatlantic