October 23, 2013
The Origins of Hezbollah

Beirut, a city battered by war, was experiencing a period of relative calm in fall 1983. U.S. diplomats and soldiers were still coming to terms with the suicide bombing that struck the U.S. embassy in April, and U.S. Marines wore their combat uniforms everywhere they went—even to social events and diplomatic functions. But to the U.S. Marine commander on site, the threat environment seemed to have eased somewhat. The embassy bombing was seen as an outlier event. Marines were free to roam the city and were interacting with Lebanese children in public without fear of ambush. Beirut was under a cease-fire, and hopes were high for Syrian reconciliation talks. It was the quiet before the storm.
In the early hours of October 23, 1983, a young Lebanese man from a Shi’a family awoke, said his morning prayers, and drank tea. In a suburb overlooking the marine barracks, his superiors shared a few final thoughts with him, after which a senior cleric blessed him before he drove off in a yellow Mercedes truck. At 6:22 a.m., he rammed the explosive-laden truck through the guard post at the entrance to the U.S. Marine Battalion Headquarters Building in Beirut. The blast decimated the four-story, concrete, steel- reinforced structure—considered one of the strongest buildings in Lebanon at the time. A dense, gray ash cloud engulfed the area as emergency vehicles rushed to the scene. Those soldiers lucky enough to escape serious injury quickly mobilized to rescue their fellow marines, sifting through “dust-covered body parts, moaning wounded and dazed survivors.” Seconds later, a nearly identical attack targeted the French Multinational Force (MNF) building less than four miles away.
Read more. [Image: Wikimedia Commons]

The Origins of Hezbollah

Beirut, a city battered by war, was experiencing a period of relative calm in fall 1983. U.S. diplomats and soldiers were still coming to terms with the suicide bombing that struck the U.S. embassy in April, and U.S. Marines wore their combat uniforms everywhere they went—even to social events and diplomatic functions. But to the U.S. Marine commander on site, the threat environment seemed to have eased somewhat. The embassy bombing was seen as an outlier event. Marines were free to roam the city and were interacting with Lebanese children in public without fear of ambush. Beirut was under a cease-fire, and hopes were high for Syrian reconciliation talks. It was the quiet before the storm.

In the early hours of October 23, 1983, a young Lebanese man from a Shi’a family awoke, said his morning prayers, and drank tea. In a suburb overlooking the marine barracks, his superiors shared a few final thoughts with him, after which a senior cleric blessed him before he drove off in a yellow Mercedes truck. At 6:22 a.m., he rammed the explosive-laden truck through the guard post at the entrance to the U.S. Marine Battalion Headquarters Building in Beirut. The blast decimated the four-story, concrete, steel- reinforced structure—considered one of the strongest buildings in Lebanon at the time. A dense, gray ash cloud engulfed the area as emergency vehicles rushed to the scene. Those soldiers lucky enough to escape serious injury quickly mobilized to rescue their fellow marines, sifting through “dust-covered body parts, moaning wounded and dazed survivors.” Seconds later, a nearly identical attack targeted the French Multinational Force (MNF) building less than four miles away.

Read more. [Image: Wikimedia Commons]

  1. marianasolayman reblogged this from theatlantic
  2. scousery1989 reblogged this from theatlantic
  3. anindiscriminatecollection reblogged this from theatlantic
  4. milkmoan reblogged this from quboor-deactivated20140412
  5. quboor-deactivated20140412 reblogged this from theatlantic
  6. fatelovesarebel reblogged this from theatlantic
  7. thedisreguardian reblogged this from theatlantic
  8. hyati-samira reblogged this from theatlantic
  9. hugogreene reblogged this from theatlantic
  10. clarissaowen reblogged this from theatlantic
  11. georgetownuniversitypress reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    Very excited about this excerpt of Matthew Levitt’s Hezbollah: The Global Footprint of Lebanon’s Party of God...
  12. like-jello-on-springs reblogged this from notorious-jew
  13. notorious-jew reblogged this from theatlantic
  14. weecefwew reblogged this from theatlantic
  15. lesisalwayswaymore reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    I really should read this as I have no idea.
  16. abszurdisztan reblogged this from theatlantic