November 1, 2013
The Unsexy Parts of Blue Is the Warmest Color Are the Most Important Parts

Watching Blue is the Warmest Color is an awfully carnal affair. French director Abdellatif Kechiche’s controversial, three-hour coming-of-age love story jumps from close-up to close-up of characters eating, kissing, touching, tonguing, crying, and butt-slapping, all passionately and voraciously, often with little else in the frame.
It’s also arguably exploitative at times. As many other critics have noted, its sex scenes are as lengthy as they are explicit; the author of the graphic novel upon which Blue is based has dismissed them as inaccurate pornography. Some have accused the film of being an advanced exercise in the male gaze; a queer romance filtered through straight people’s imaginations of what that should look like. Co-stars Adèle Exarchopoulos and Léa Seydoux say they’ll never work with Kechiche again because of his on-set bullying, and it’s hard to ignore the film’s voyeuristic tendencies considering how much screen time it devotes to watching Exarchopoulos’s character (also named Adèle) fall fast asleep, mouth agape, lost in dreamland (not unlike how she looks when awake).
Read more. [Image: Sundance Selects]

The Unsexy Parts of Blue Is the Warmest Color Are the Most Important Parts

Watching Blue is the Warmest Color is an awfully carnal affair. French director Abdellatif Kechiche’s controversial, three-hour coming-of-age love story jumps from close-up to close-up of characters eating, kissing, touching, tonguing, crying, and butt-slapping, all passionately and voraciously, often with little else in the frame.

It’s also arguably exploitative at times. As many other critics have noted, its sex scenes are as lengthy as they are explicit; the author of the graphic novel upon which Blue is based has dismissed them as inaccurate pornography. Some have accused the film of being an advanced exercise in the male gaze; a queer romance filtered through straight people’s imaginations of what that should look like. Co-stars Adèle Exarchopoulos and Léa Seydoux say they’ll never work with Kechiche again because of his on-set bullying, and it’s hard to ignore the film’s voyeuristic tendencies considering how much screen time it devotes to watching Exarchopoulos’s character (also named Adèle) fall fast asleep, mouth agape, lost in dreamland (not unlike how she looks when awake).

Read more. [Image: Sundance Selects]

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    I don’t really have opinions, having not read the book or seen the movie. But I feel like this headline is true of...
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