November 8, 2013
The Kremlin is Losing Control of the Nationalist Movement It Helped Create

For all the crude xenophobic placards and slogans at this week’s Russian March, one stood out for its—dare I say—cleverness. 
“The good half of the population already hates the regime. Soon you will get to know the bad half,” read a sign carried by a marcher.
Not only was it clever, but it also rang true. In a recent editorial, Gazeta.ru wrote that “for the first time, nationalist marches are taking on an oppositionist character.”
After years of successfully manipulating nationalists for their own purposes and cultivating xenophobia among the population, the Kremlin is now standing face-to-face with the monster it helped create. “Those nationalists who did not join up with the authorities in time attached themselves to the protest movement—you have to avoid your own marginalization somehow,” political analyst Andrei Kolesnikov wrote in a​recent commentary. 
In addition to the predictable chants of “Russia for Russians,” “Stop Feeding the Caucasus,” and various anti-migrant diatribes at this year’s Russian March, there were plenty of calls for the end of Vladimir Putin’s “Chekist regime.”
Read more. [Image: Maxim Shemetov/Reuters]

The Kremlin is Losing Control of the Nationalist Movement It Helped Create

For all the crude xenophobic placards and slogans at this week’s Russian March, one stood out for its—dare I say—cleverness. 

“The good half of the population already hates the regime. Soon you will get to know the bad half,” read a sign carried by a marcher.

Not only was it clever, but it also rang true. In a recent editorial, Gazeta.ru wrote that “for the first time, nationalist marches are taking on an oppositionist character.”

After years of successfully manipulating nationalists for their own purposes and cultivating xenophobia among the population, the Kremlin is now standing face-to-face with the monster it helped create. “Those nationalists who did not join up with the authorities in time attached themselves to the protest movement—you have to avoid your own marginalization somehow,” political analyst Andrei Kolesnikov wrote in a​recent commentary

In addition to the predictable chants of “Russia for Russians,” “Stop Feeding the Caucasus,” and various anti-migrant diatribes at this year’s Russian March, there were plenty of calls for the end of Vladimir Putin’s “Chekist regime.”

Read more. [Image: Maxim Shemetov/Reuters]

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