November 13, 2013
More Than Half of U.S. Public Schools Don’t Have Adequate Wireless Access

A crime is happening in our schools every day. And it’s not the type of crime that hall monitors or security cameras can solve. At issue: Only 39 percent of public schools have wireless network access for the whole school. But perhaps the greater offense—up to this point, at least—has been apathy.


At work and at home, most of us live our very wired, connected lives—moving between wi-fi zones as we give little thought to the millions of schoolchildren around the country who go to school every day without Internet or broadband connections, without access to 1:1 computing, and without the benefit of modern handheld learning devices.




 
Angry mobs of parents should be storming schools with pitchforks over this critical issue of broadband access, US Department of Education official Richard Culatta told this year’s SXSWedu festival. For their part, parents are not, but perhaps there is good reason to believe that the Storming of the Schoolhouse can be thwarted. For now.




 
President Barack Obama’s ConnectED initiative, announced this summer, aims within five years to connect 99 percent of America’s students through next-generation broadband (at speeds no less than 100 Mbps and with a target of 1 Gbps) and high-speed wireless networks in schools. Now we’re talking.


 
Read more. [Image: AP Photo]

More Than Half of U.S. Public Schools Don’t Have Adequate Wireless Access

A crime is happening in our schools every day. And it’s not the type of crime that hall monitors or security cameras can solve. At issue: Only 39 percent of public schools have wireless network access for the whole school. But perhaps the greater offense—up to this point, at least—has been apathy.

At work and at home, most of us live our very wired, connected lives—moving between wi-fi zones as we give little thought to the millions of schoolchildren around the country who go to school every day without Internet or broadband connections, without access to 1:1 computing, and without the benefit of modern handheld learning devices.
 
Angry mobs of parents should be storming schools with pitchforks over this critical issue of broadband access, US Department of Education official Richard Culatta told this year’s SXSWedu festival. For their part, parents are not, but perhaps there is good reason to believe that the Storming of the Schoolhouse can be thwarted. For now.
 
President Barack Obama’s ConnectED initiative, announced this summer, aims within five years to connect 99 percent of America’s students through next-generation broadband (at speeds no less than 100 Mbps and with a target of 1 Gbps) and high-speed wireless networks in schools. Now we’re talking.
 
Read more. [Image: AP Photo]

  1. nsheff reblogged this from knowledgeequalsblackpower
  2. lustermuse reblogged this from theatlantic
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  8. tenhoursinthelab reblogged this from bookoisseur and added:
    ^^ This. Adequate, up to date classroom materials; teachers who are more excited about creative teaching than they are...
  9. educatedthuggin reblogged this from knowledgeequalsblackpower
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  15. mahfablife reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    Yes! Bring angry mobs and pitchforks! Make my school’s wifi work!!!!
  16. jodrescher reblogged this from theatlantic
  17. balletbookworm reblogged this from bookoisseur and added:
    Agreed. Schools need good textbooks and materials that are up-to-date as well as adequate Internet access.
  18. thestorieswegive reblogged this from theatlantic