November 14, 2013
Obesity, Not Old People, is Making Healthcare Expensive

Since 1900, the average American lifespan has increased by 30 years, or by 62 percent. That nugget comes near the beginning of a new report taking stock of the U.S. healthcare system, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association this week, and it’s also pretty much the last piece of good news in it.
The study authors—a combination of experts from Alerion Advisors, Johns Hopkins University, the University of Rochester, and the Boston Consulting Group—take a point-by-point look at why healthcare costs so much, why our outcomes are comparatively poor, and what accounts for the growth in medical expenditures.
In the process, they brought to light a number of surprising realities that debunk popular misconceptions about health spending.
Here are some of the juiciest.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

Obesity, Not Old People, is Making Healthcare Expensive

Since 1900, the average American lifespan has increased by 30 years, or by 62 percent. That nugget comes near the beginning of a new report taking stock of the U.S. healthcare system, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association this week, and it’s also pretty much the last piece of good news in it.

The study authors—a combination of experts from Alerion Advisors, Johns Hopkins University, the University of Rochester, and the Boston Consulting Group—take a point-by-point look at why healthcare costs so much, why our outcomes are comparatively poor, and what accounts for the growth in medical expenditures.

In the process, they brought to light a number of surprising realities that debunk popular misconceptions about health spending.

Here are some of the juiciest.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

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  9. pmuthiah reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    I wouldn’t say it’s one or the other…but chronic disease in general is making a huge impact on health care costs.
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    more accurately: "The biggest-spending disease with the fastest growth rate was hyperlipidemia—high cholesterol and...
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    Obesity, Not Old People, is Making Healthcare Expensive Since 1900, the average American lifespan has increased by 30...
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