November 14, 2013
Stunning ‘Pop-Up’ Photographs That Showcase China’s Ethnic Diversity

Each of China’s 1.3 billion people are members of one—and only one—of 56 ethnic groups; those of mixed blood are not legally permitted to claim two. Over 91 percent of the population are Han Chinese, while the rest—numbering 105 million people—are referred to as “ethnic minorities.”  While some ethnic minority groups have well-publicized clashes with the majority Han (most famously the Tibetans and Uighurs), the vast majority of the others are little known—even within China.
Nearly half of China’s ethnic minority groups are native to Yunnan Province, an area roughly the size of California that borders Laos, Vietnam, and Burma, and a popular destination for both domestic and international travelers. The Philadelphia-based artist Collete Fu has spent years photographing minority groups throughout the province, from the high mountain ranges near Tibet to the tropical Red River valley. But, instead of presenting her work in a conventional style, Fu has upped the ante: she’s made pop-up books. These aren’t the simple, pop-up books that you owned as a kid, either: they’re three-dimensional mosaics of people, artifacts, and landscapes unique to this corner of China.
Read more. [Image: Collette Fu]

Stunning ‘Pop-Up’ Photographs That Showcase China’s Ethnic Diversity

Each of China’s 1.3 billion people are members of one—and only one—of 56 ethnic groups; those of mixed blood are not legally permitted to claim two. Over 91 percent of the population are Han Chinese, while the rest—numbering 105 million people—are referred to as “ethnic minorities.”  While some ethnic minority groups have well-publicized clashes with the majority Han (most famously the Tibetans and Uighurs), the vast majority of the others are little known—even within China.

Nearly half of China’s ethnic minority groups are native to Yunnan Province, an area roughly the size of California that borders Laos, Vietnam, and Burma, and a popular destination for both domestic and international travelers. The Philadelphia-based artist Collete Fu has spent years photographing minority groups throughout the province, from the high mountain ranges near Tibet to the tropical Red River valley. But, instead of presenting her work in a conventional style, Fu has upped the ante: she’s made pop-up books. These aren’t the simple, pop-up books that you owned as a kid, either: they’re three-dimensional mosaics of people, artifacts, and landscapes unique to this corner of China.

Read more. [Image: Collette Fu]

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    I met an international student once (disappointingly I can’t remember her name anymore) but she was from one of the...
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