November 19, 2013
How Three Decades of News Coverage Has Shaped Our View of the World

Head to the homepages of major news sites today, and you’ll get the impression that the bombing near the Iranian embassy in Beirut, the early warnings about HealthCare.gov’s technical problems, and the travail’s of Toronto’s scandal-saturated mayor are among the biggest stories in the world right now.

Or are they?

Defining what’s news, as any editor will tell you, is an inherently subjective exercise, and a new set of charts by the Oxford Internet Institute’s Information Geographies blog captures more than three decades of our efforts to do so.

The map above shows locations mentioned in news coverage of events between 1979 and 2013, as compiled by the Global Database of Events, Language, and Tone (GDELT). Researchers Mark Graham and Stefano De Sabbata pored over the database and isolated 43 million events in which the primary actors were located in different places, and then plotted the results. The brighter the line in the image above, the more links there are between locations.
It’s a visual that offers some interesting insights about the countries that have dominated headlines since 1979.
Read more.

How Three Decades of News Coverage Has Shaped Our View of the World

Head to the homepages of major news sites today, and you’ll get the impression that the bombing near the Iranian embassy in Beirut, the early warnings about HealthCare.gov’s technical problems, and the travail’s of Toronto’s scandal-saturated mayor are among the biggest stories in the world right now.

Or are they?

Defining what’s news, as any editor will tell you, is an inherently subjective exercise, and a new set of charts by the Oxford Internet Institute’s Information Geographies blog captures more than three decades of our efforts to do so.

The map above shows locations mentioned in news coverage of events between 1979 and 2013, as compiled by the Global Database of Events, Language, and Tone (GDELT). Researchers Mark Graham and Stefano De Sabbata pored over the database and isolated 43 million events in which the primary actors were located in different places, and then plotted the results. The brighter the line in the image above, the more links there are between locations.

It’s a visual that offers some interesting insights about the countries that have dominated headlines since 1979.

Read more.

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  19. thenewmrsmoon reblogged this from barthel and added:
    Interesting!!