December 23, 2013
Why Superheroes Still Can’t Have It All

Amy Sturgess has a demanding job, a dysfunctional family, and a baffling love life. She also has a bottle of Xanax permanently stashed in her pocket. Those pills come in especially handy when her pager buzzes in the middle of a meeting, instructing her to slip on a cape and turn into her alter ego, Starling. To make matters more stressful, Amy’s coworkers have no idea who she really is: While she’s off fighting crime, everyone assumes she’s just taking a really long time in the bathroom.
Sage Stossel’s first graphic novel is many things: a delightful satire, an offbeat romance, and a thought-provoking parable about why women still can’t have it all. It’s also a story about living, and thriving, with anxiety—which happens to be the subject of her brother, Scott’s, current Atlantic cover story (and forthcoming book). In this interview, Sage—a prolific cartoonist, the author of two children’s books, and an Atlantic contributing editor—talks about her unconventional superhero, her creative process, and her own memories of growing up with an anxious brother.
Read more.

Why Superheroes Still Can’t Have It All

Amy Sturgess has a demanding job, a dysfunctional family, and a baffling love life. She also has a bottle of Xanax permanently stashed in her pocket. Those pills come in especially handy when her pager buzzes in the middle of a meeting, instructing her to slip on a cape and turn into her alter ego, Starling. To make matters more stressful, Amy’s coworkers have no idea who she really is: While she’s off fighting crime, everyone assumes she’s just taking a really long time in the bathroom.

Sage Stossel’s first graphic novel is many things: a delightful satire, an offbeat romance, and a thought-provoking parable about why women still can’t have it all. It’s also a story about living, and thriving, with anxiety—which happens to be the subject of her brother, Scott’s, current Atlantic cover story (and forthcoming book). In this interview, Sage—a prolific cartoonist, the author of two children’s books, and an Atlantic contributing editor—talks about her unconventional superhero, her creative process, and her own memories of growing up with an anxious brother.

Read more.

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    Or maybe she just imagines it all because she’s high
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