January 7, 2014
How to Walk on Hot Coals: The Singular Power of Belief

Positive thinking has been a mainstay of self-help for hundreds of years. Thomas Jefferson wrote, “Nothing can stop the man with the right mental attitude from achieving his goal; nothing on earth can help the man with the wrong mental attitude.” A hundred years later, Henry David  Thoreau  said, “Thought is the sculptor who can create the person you want to be.” William James claimed that the greatest discovery of his generation was that “human beings can alter their lives by altering their attitudes of mind.”
In the latter half of the 19th century, a man named Phineas P. Quimby founded the New Thought movement. Born in 1802, Quimby was a small, black-eyed, energetic man with little formal education. A clockmaker’s apprentice, he abruptly changed careers in 1838 when he became fascinated with Mesmerism (named after Dr. Mesmer, who had attempted to cure illness using the mind, eliciting ridicule and rejection among his colleagues and eventually forcing him to leave Vienna in 1777). After practicing on a 17-year-old boy, Quimby proclaimed himself a healer, based only on his self-training. Quimby believed that disease was nothing more than an “error of the mind.” Since disease sprang from the mind, not the body, it had to be cured using the mind.
Read more. [Image: Robert S. Donovan/Flickr]

How to Walk on Hot Coals: The Singular Power of Belief

Positive thinking has been a mainstay of self-help for hundreds of years. Thomas Jefferson wrote, “Nothing can stop the man with the right mental attitude from achieving his goal; nothing on earth can help the man with the wrong mental attitude.” A hundred years later, Henry David  Thoreau  said, “Thought is the sculptor who can create the person you want to be.” William James claimed that the greatest discovery of his generation was that “human beings can alter their lives by altering their attitudes of mind.”

In the latter half of the 19th century, a man named Phineas P. Quimby founded the New Thought movement. Born in 1802, Quimby was a small, black-eyed, energetic man with little formal education. A clockmaker’s apprentice, he abruptly changed careers in 1838 when he became fascinated with Mesmerism (named after Dr. Mesmer, who had attempted to cure illness using the mind, eliciting ridicule and rejection among his colleagues and eventually forcing him to leave Vienna in 1777). After practicing on a 17-year-old boy, Quimby proclaimed himself a healer, based only on his self-training. Quimby believed that disease was nothing more than an “error of the mind.” Since disease sprang from the mind, not the body, it had to be cured using the mind.

Read more. [Image: Robert S. Donovan/Flickr]

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    Interesting.
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