January 8, 2014
Kale, Kale Everywhere, But Only Cheetos to Eat

A food desert, according to the USDA, is an area that lacks grocery stores, farmer’s markets, and other sources of healthy food. People living in food deserts often struggle to buy fresh produce, the thinking goes, so they rely on junk- and fast food, which contributes to their health problems. 
But what happens when you live in the opposite of a food desert? A place that is literally surrounded by the freshest food possible—a farm?
According to a wonderful recent piece in Modern Farmer, today’s busy farmers are like the ancient mariner: Kale, kale everywhere, but only Cheetos to eat.
Farmers’ days often stretch to 12 and 16 hours as they rush from field to CSA pickup to farmer’s market. As with Americans in other professions, the time crunch means cooking is often the first thing to go. A variety of growers told Modern Farmer that they snack on candy all day and their families live on pizza during harvest season. 
“At the height of the season, it is a feat in and of itself to sustain the energy to work let alone come home and start preparing food,” one Massachusetts farmer told the magazine.
Read more. [Image: alice_henneman/flickr]

Kale, Kale Everywhere, But Only Cheetos to Eat

A food desert, according to the USDA, is an area that lacks grocery stores, farmer’s markets, and other sources of healthy food. People living in food deserts often struggle to buy fresh produce, the thinking goes, so they rely on junk- and fast food, which contributes to their health problems. 

But what happens when you live in the opposite of a food desert? A place that is literally surrounded by the freshest food possible—a farm?

According to a wonderful recent piece in Modern Farmer, today’s busy farmers are like the ancient mariner: Kale, kale everywhere, but only Cheetos to eat.

Farmers’ days often stretch to 12 and 16 hours as they rush from field to CSA pickup to farmer’s market. As with Americans in other professions, the time crunch means cooking is often the first thing to go. A variety of growers told Modern Farmer that they snack on candy all day and their families live on pizza during harvest season. 

“At the height of the season, it is a feat in and of itself to sustain the energy to work let alone come home and start preparing food,” one Massachusetts farmer told the magazine.

Read more. [Image: alice_henneman/flickr]

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    Thinking about how this also applies to the pickers and hired laborers on those farms, who make even less than the...
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  19. kellypope said: i like how the image isn’t kale at all
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