January 14, 2014
'Spiritual, But Not Religious': A Rising, Misunderstood Voting Bloc

Spirituality is a big story in politics. Maybe as big a story as religion. It’s been more than a decade since evangelicals helped George W. Bush win the White House, and we’ve gotten used to the idea of the “values voter,” of religion as a political force. But while the evangelical bloc seems to have frayed a bit and liberal mainline religion continues to lose influence, another major religious category is gathering force and deserves politician and pundit attention—the “spiritual but not religious” vote.
A fifth of Americans check “none” on surveys of religious preference. Among the young adults under 30 who helped propel Obama into office, a full third check “none.” Atheist pundits are quick to claim these gains for their own, but that is not the case—nearly 70 percent of “nones” report belief in God or a universal spirit, and 37 percent describe themselves as “spiritual but not religious.” This may or may not be the story of the decline of “religion,” but it is clearly also the story of the ascent of “spirituality.”
Read more. [Image: Forsaken Fotos/Flickr]

'Spiritual, But Not Religious': A Rising, Misunderstood Voting Bloc

Spirituality is a big story in politics. Maybe as big a story as religion. It’s been more than a decade since evangelicals helped George W. Bush win the White House, and we’ve gotten used to the idea of the “values voter,” of religion as a political force. But while the evangelical bloc seems to have frayed a bit and liberal mainline religion continues to lose influence, another major religious category is gathering force and deserves politician and pundit attention—the “spiritual but not religious” vote.

A fifth of Americans check “none” on surveys of religious preference. Among the young adults under 30 who helped propel Obama into office, a full third check “none.” Atheist pundits are quick to claim these gains for their own, but that is not the case—nearly 70 percent of “nones” report belief in God or a universal spirit, and 37 percent describe themselves as “spiritual but not religious.” This may or may not be the story of the decline of “religion,” but it is clearly also the story of the ascent of “spirituality.”

Read more. [Image: Forsaken Fotos/Flickr]

  1. adhdad reblogged this from theatlantic
  2. fromliberty reblogged this from cognitivedissonance
  3. decause reblogged this from cognitivedissonance
  4. molly-bergstrom reblogged this from cognitivedissonance
  5. laineleigh reblogged this from cognitivedissonance
  6. asiansalmon reblogged this from cognitivedissonance
  7. giltbyassociation reblogged this from cognitivedissonance
  8. nsaynevisions reblogged this from cognitivedissonance
  9. randycwhite reblogged this from cognitivedissonance
  10. mujerardiente reblogged this from cognitivedissonance
  11. tazzygal reblogged this from cognitivedissonance
  12. fuckedupbutnotfuckedover reblogged this from cognitivedissonance
  13. surprise-itsme reblogged this from cognitivedissonance
  14. c0smic-crunch reblogged this from cognitivedissonance
  15. cognitivedissonance reblogged this from theatlantic
  16. saintvenusofharsimus reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    'Spiritual, But Not Religious': A Rising, Misunderstood Voting Bloc
  17. bematthe reblogged this from teamanthro
  18. sgon08 reblogged this from theatlantic
  19. apocolopolyps reblogged this from theatlantic
  20. silverpoethat reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    Food for thought
  21. martysblog reblogged this from theatlantic
  22. whelmed-in-deeper-gulfs-than-he reblogged this from theatlantic
  23. mixleplick reblogged this from theatlantic
  24. intertekstualisht reblogged this from theatlantic
  25. whovian971 reblogged this from theatlantic
  26. rosecurve reblogged this from theatlantic
  27. thereluctantpartisan reblogged this from theatlantic