February 3, 2014
How When Harry Met Sally Explains Income Inequality

Inequality has exploded the past 30 years, because of the usual suspects: technology, Wall Street, Harry, and Sally.
Okay, it probably isn’t fair to blame Billy Crystal and Meg Ryan for our widening income gap. But it is fair to say that When Harry Met Sally tells us something about why the rich have been getting so much richer than everyone else. That’s high-earning college grads marrying each other—which a new paper estimates has increased inequality by 25 percent.
We used to live in a Mad Men world. Few men went to college, even fewer women did, and not many women, period, worked outside the home—not that they had many opportunities if they did. In 1960, 42.5 percent of married women hadn’t graduated from high school. 39.6 percent had only done that. And just 37.7 percent of all women had or were looking for a job. The stereotype is that men married their secretaries, if their wives did work, and there’s something to that—though highly-educated people did still pair up at high rates back then.
Read more. [Image: Wikimedia Commons]

How When Harry Met Sally Explains Income Inequality

Inequality has exploded the past 30 years, because of the usual suspects: technology, Wall Street, Harry, and Sally.

Okay, it probably isn’t fair to blame Billy Crystal and Meg Ryan for our widening income gap. But it is fair to say that When Harry Met Sally tells us something about why the rich have been getting so much richer than everyone else. That’s high-earning college grads marrying each other—which a new paper estimates has increased inequality by 25 percent.

We used to live in a Mad Men world. Few men went to college, even fewer women did, and not many women, period, worked outside the home—not that they had many opportunities if they did. In 1960, 42.5 percent of married women hadn’t graduated from high school. 39.6 percent had only done that. And just 37.7 percent of all women had or were looking for a job. The stereotype is that men married their secretaries, if their wives did work, and there’s something to that—though highly-educated people did still pair up at high rates back then.

Read more. [Image: Wikimedia Commons]

  1. 4rdprefect reblogged this from theatlantic
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  5. quaintlyburntorange reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    When Harry met Sally
  6. velour-noir reblogged this from theatlantic
  7. econmajorstruggles reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    This is a fantastic, fascinating article.
  8. loverofhollywood reblogged this from theatlantic
  9. justgrapefruits reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    To read.
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  19. polisciteach reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    Hmm that’s one way to look at it….
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