February 4, 2014
New Research Says There Are Only Four Emotions

“Just because you’ve got the emotional range of a teaspoon doesn’t mean we all have,” an angry Hermione tells her friend Ron in a heated Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix moment.
Actually though, we all might have. New research from the Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology at the University of Glasgow, published this week in Current Biology, says the range of human emotion may be a little closer to a teaspoon than previously thought. 
Conventional scientific wisdom recognizes six “classic” emotions: happy, surprised, afraid, disgusted, angry, and sad. But the Glasgow scientists studied people’s facial expressions, and the emotions they signal, by showing people computer-generated facial animations. They asked the observers to characterize the faces based on those six basic emotions, and found that anger and disgust looked very similar to the observers in the early stages, as did fear and surprise. For example, both anger and disgust share a wrinkled nose, and both surprise and fear share raised eyebrows.
Read more. [Image: joeannenah/Flickr]

New Research Says There Are Only Four Emotions

Just because you’ve got the emotional range of a teaspoon doesn’t mean we all have,” an angry Hermione tells her friend Ron in a heated Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix moment.

Actually though, we all might have. New research from the Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology at the University of Glasgow, published this week in Current Biology, says the range of human emotion may be a little closer to a teaspoon than previously thought.

Conventional scientific wisdom recognizes six “classic” emotions: happy, surprised, afraid, disgusted, angry, and sad. But the Glasgow scientists studied people’s facial expressions, and the emotions they signal, by showing people computer-generated facial animations. They asked the observers to characterize the faces based on those six basic emotions, and found that anger and disgust looked very similar to the observers in the early stages, as did fear and surprise. For example, both anger and disgust share a wrinkled nose, and both surprise and fear share raised eyebrows.

Read more. [Image: joeannenah/Flickr]

4:25pm
  
Filed under: Health Emotion Expression 
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    It can be said that one of the uses of eyebrows is to convey the “volume” or intensity of arousal during emotion...
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    New Research Says There Are Only Four Emotions Read more. [Image: joeannenah/Flickr] (via theatlantic)
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  18. myxiaokeai reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    So we need a word for afraid/surprised and angry/disgusted.
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