March 13, 2014
The Fed Absolutely Shouldn’t Give Up on the Long-Term Unemployed

re the long-term unemployed just doomed today or doomed forever?
That’s the question people are really asking when they ask if labor markets are starting to get “tight.” Now, it’s hard to believe that this is even a debate when unemployment is still at 6.7 percent and core inflation is just 1.1 percent. But it is. The new inflation hawks argue that these headline numbers overstate how much slack is left in the economy. That the labor force is smaller than it sounds, because firms won’t even consider hiring the long-term unemployed. That our productive capacity is lower than it sounds, because we haven’t invested in new factories for too long. And that wages and prices will start rising as companies pay more for the workers and work that they want.

In other words, they think that the financial crisis has made us permanently poorer. That the economy can’t grow as fast as it used to, so inflation will pick up sooner than it used to—and we need to get ready to raise rates. (Notice how that’s always the answer no matter the question).
There are only two problems with this story: There’s not much evidence for it, and we should ignore it even if there is. It’s pretty simple.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

The Fed Absolutely Shouldn’t Give Up on the Long-Term Unemployed

re the long-term unemployed just doomed today or doomed forever?

That’s the question people are really asking when they ask if labor markets are starting to get “tight.” Now, it’s hard to believe that this is even a debate when unemployment is still at 6.7 percent and core inflation is just 1.1 percent. But it is. The new inflation hawks argue that these headline numbers overstate how much slack is left in the economy. That the labor force is smaller than it sounds, because firms won’t even consider hiring the long-term unemployed. That our productive capacity is lower than it sounds, because we haven’t invested in new factories for too long. And that wages and prices will start rising as companies pay more for the workers and work that they want.

In other words, they think that the financial crisis has made us permanently poorer. That the economy can’t grow as fast as it used to, so inflation will pick up sooner than it used to—and we need to get ready to raise rates. (Notice how that’s always the answer no matter the question).

There are only two problems with this story: There’s not much evidence for it, and we should ignore it even if there is. It’s pretty simple.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

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