November 28, 2012
In Alzheimer’s Disease, Maintaining Connection and ‘Saving Face’

We tend to preserve a mental image of the person as they were prior to their illness, the way we’ve known them our whole lives. Think about when you reunite with someone you haven’t seen in 20 years. Before you meet with them, you have an image of them from 20 years ago frozen in your memory. You are always at least a little surprised that, in reality, they have aged. You might recoil at the thought that they must be thinking the exact same thing. As our parents age, we continue to see them as the people that we love and in the roles that they played in our lives in the past — strong, supportive, and knowledgeable.

Read more. [Image: uabmagazine]

In Alzheimer’s Disease, Maintaining Connection and ‘Saving Face’

We tend to preserve a mental image of the person as they were prior to their illness, the way we’ve known them our whole lives. Think about when you reunite with someone you haven’t seen in 20 years. Before you meet with them, you have an image of them from 20 years ago frozen in your memory. You are always at least a little surprised that, in reality, they have aged. You might recoil at the thought that they must be thinking the exact same thing. As our parents age, we continue to see them as the people that we love and in the roles that they played in our lives in the past — strong, supportive, and knowledgeable.

Read more. [Image: uabmagazine]

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