May 8, 2014
theatlanticcities:


Although large cities have led the way with bike infrastructure innovations and grabbed the national headlines, bicycling is also on the rise in many small and midsized cities. With a bike share of commuters at 6 percent in 2012, Portland led all large American cities, but lagged behind smaller cities such as Davis, California (19 percent), Boulder, Colorado (12 percent), Corvallis, Oregon (11 percent), and Santa Cruz, California (9 percent). Smaller cities may offer some advantages for cycling because their shorter trip distances are more easily covered by bike, and because lower volumes of motor vehicle traffic make cycling less stressful.

-The Rise of Bicycling in Smaller and Midsize U.S. Cities
[Image: League of American Bicyclists]

theatlanticcities:

Although large cities have led the way with bike infrastructure innovations and grabbed the national headlines, bicycling is also on the rise in many small and midsized cities. With a bike share of commuters at 6 percent in 2012, Portland led all large American cities, but lagged behind smaller cities such as Davis, California (19 percent), Boulder, Colorado (12 percent), Corvallis, Oregon (11 percent), and Santa Cruz, California (9 percent). Smaller cities may offer some advantages for cycling because their shorter trip distances are more easily covered by bike, and because lower volumes of motor vehicle traffic make cycling less stressful.

-The Rise of Bicycling in Smaller and Midsize U.S. Cities

[Image: League of American Bicyclists]

(Source: thisiscitylab)

October 10, 2013

Finding Jesus on a Motorcycle

“I believe Jesus rides a Harley, there’s no doubt about it.”

Read more.

August 29, 2012

A Concept Bike Designed for Running

Ever wish you could do less riding and more running on your daily bicycle commute? Neither have we. But that seems to be the idea behind the German-designed FLIZ, a new concept velocipede that nixes the pedaling and suspends its rider runner from a harness.

Read more. [Images: FLIZ]

11:27am
  
Filed under: Biking Bicycles Design Commuting WTF 
July 31, 2012
Terrify Your Fellow Bikers with This Glowing Anglerfish-Cycle 
[Image: Andy Wana/Flickr]

Terrify Your Fellow Bikers with This Glowing Anglerfish-Cycle 

[Image: Andy Wana/Flickr]

10:24am
  
Filed under: Anglerfish Bike Biking Bicycles Art 
May 17, 2012
The Next Great Technology Platform: The Bicycle

Bikes have already changed our relationships to each other and the urban environment, but consider the potential for so much more.
Imagine a future where cities go beyond bike lanes and build the urban environment around bikes. What would a bike highway look like? What would city life be like without cars? Imagine a healthier city — no more kids in the Bronx with asthma — and reduced automobile fatalities.
The biggest opportunity here is that given what we know about how bikes change our social dynamics, how would this play out on a mass scale? Amplify that with sensing and tracking technologies on board the human battery-powered bike platform and the possibilities are endless. Handgrips that monitor your pulse and heart rate multiplied by millions will help us better understand the people who live in entire neighborhoods, and the pace of life from a global perspective. Such data will inspire exciting design solutions.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

The Next Great Technology Platform: The Bicycle

Bikes have already changed our relationships to each other and the urban environment, but consider the potential for so much more.

Imagine a future where cities go beyond bike lanes and build the urban environment around bikes. What would a bike highway look like? What would city life be like without cars? Imagine a healthier city — no more kids in the Bronx with asthma — and reduced automobile fatalities.

The biggest opportunity here is that given what we know about how bikes change our social dynamics, how would this play out on a mass scale? Amplify that with sensing and tracking technologies on board the human battery-powered bike platform and the possibilities are endless. Handgrips that monitor your pulse and heart rate multiplied by millions will help us better understand the people who live in entire neighborhoods, and the pace of life from a global perspective. Such data will inspire exciting design solutions.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

9:46am
  
Filed under: Bicycles Bikes Biking Cycling 
May 15, 2012

theatlanticvideo:

Bike Messengers Fight to Take Back Europe’s Most Congested City

Brussels Express, a documentary by Sander Vandenbroucke, looks at how commuters and messengers can make a dent in the city’s overwhelming traffic.

5:29pm
  
Filed under: Biking Bicycles Bikes Cycling Brussels 
May 10, 2012
To Catch a Bike Thief: D.C. Cyclist Tracks Down Stolen Bike Online, Steals It Back


The story of how a Washington, D.C., cyclist who recovered his stolen bike isn’t the biggest news of the day, nor the most dramatic, but it’s an absolute inspiration to those of us who love our bikes and fear having them stolen. NBC Washington’s Richard Jordan explains:
He arranged to buy his bike back. A man came out of an alley at 5th and Longfellow streets NW with the bike, and Lesh took it for a “test ride.”
Lesh simply rode off without paying.
"This guy finally started calling me, and left a message saying he was going to call the police," Lesh said, laughing.

[Image: AP]

To Catch a Bike Thief: D.C. Cyclist Tracks Down Stolen Bike Online, Steals It Back

The story of how a Washington, D.C., cyclist who recovered his stolen bike isn’t the biggest news of the day, nor the most dramatic, but it’s an absolute inspiration to those of us who love our bikes and fear having them stolen. NBC Washington’s Richard Jordan explains:

He arranged to buy his bike back. A man came out of an alley at 5th and Longfellow streets NW with the bike, and Lesh took it for a “test ride.”

Lesh simply rode off without paying.

"This guy finally started calling me, and left a message saying he was going to call the police," Lesh said, laughing.

[Image: AP]

April 10, 2012
Why Young Americans Are Driving So Much Less Than Their Parents

Young people are also making more use of transit, bikes, and foot power to get around. In 2009, 16 to 34-year-olds took 24 percent more bike trips than they took in 2001. They walked to their destinations 16 percent more often, while their passenger miles on transit jumped by 40 percent.
Part of the reason for this shift is financial. The report calculates the average cost of owning and operating a car as north of $8,700 dollars a year, and that was before gasoline passed $4.00 per gallon. In the wake of the financial crisis, many underemployed young people have decided that they either can’t afford a car or would rather spend their money on other things. The report cites a Zipcar/KRC Research survey, which found that 80 percent of 18 to 34-year-olds stated that the high cost of gasoline, parking, and maintenance made owning a car difficult.
But money doesn’t explain everything. Sixteen to 34-year-olds in households with incomes of more than $70,000 per year are increasingly choosing not to drive as well, according to the report. They have increased their use of public transit by 100 percent, biking by 122 percent, and walking by 37 percent.
The shift away from the car is part and parcel of a new way of life being embraced by young Americans, which places less emphasis on big cars or big houses as status symbols or life’s essentials.
Read more at The Atlantic Cities. [Image: Shutterstock]

Why Young Americans Are Driving So Much Less Than Their Parents

Young people are also making more use of transit, bikes, and foot power to get around. In 2009, 16 to 34-year-olds took 24 percent more bike trips than they took in 2001. They walked to their destinations 16 percent more often, while their passenger miles on transit jumped by 40 percent.

Part of the reason for this shift is financial. The report calculates the average cost of owning and operating a car as north of $8,700 dollars a year, and that was before gasoline passed $4.00 per gallon. In the wake of the financial crisis, many underemployed young people have decided that they either can’t afford a car or would rather spend their money on other things. The report cites a Zipcar/KRC Research survey, which found that 80 percent of 18 to 34-year-olds stated that the high cost of gasoline, parking, and maintenance made owning a car difficult.

But money doesn’t explain everything. Sixteen to 34-year-olds in households with incomes of more than $70,000 per year are increasingly choosing not to drive as well, according to the report. They have increased their use of public transit by 100 percent, biking by 122 percent, and walking by 37 percent.

The shift away from the car is part and parcel of a new way of life being embraced by young Americans, which places less emphasis on big cars or big houses as status symbols or life’s essentials.

Read more at The Atlantic Cities. [Image: Shutterstock]

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