January 23, 2013

How America’s Top Colleges Reflect (and Massively Distort) the Country’s Racial Evolution

[Images: National Center for Education Statistics]

January 14, 2013
How Low Are U.S. Taxes Compared to Other Countries?
[Image: Henry Blodget]

How Low Are U.S. Taxes Compared to Other Countries?

[Image: Henry Blodget]

12:54pm
  
Filed under: Taxes Economics Chart Politics 
December 18, 2012
The Demographics of Gun Ownership, Nate Silver-Style


Nate Silver has brought his trademark data analysis to the newfound gun control discussion today, breaking down what gun ownership in this country looks like numerically. Using data from a 2008 national exit poll—the question was not included, he explains, on 2012 exit polls—some of the details in his chart will likely strike you as obvious: for instance, that Republicans own more guns than Democrats and that there are far more guns in rural areas. What might be more interesting, as Silver points out, is that gun ownership is not necessarily tied to being religiously devout, despite Presdident Obama’s 2008 suggestion about communities that “cling to guns or religion.” Also, the chart reveals that gun ownership is “highest among the middle class,” as Silver writes, with people making $50,000 to $100,000 per year more likely to own guns than their counterparts in other wage groups.
Read more.

The Demographics of Gun Ownership, Nate Silver-Style

Nate Silver has brought his trademark data analysis to the newfound gun control discussion today, breaking down what gun ownership in this country looks like numerically. Using data from a 2008 national exit poll—the question was not included, he explains, on 2012 exit polls—some of the details in his chart will likely strike you as obvious: for instance, that Republicans own more guns than Democrats and that there are far more guns in rural areas. What might be more interesting, as Silver points out, is that gun ownership is not necessarily tied to being religiously devout, despite Presdident Obama’s 2008 suggestion about communities that “cling to guns or religion.” Also, the chart reveals that gun ownership is “highest among the middle class,” as Silver writes, with people making $50,000 to $100,000 per year more likely to own guns than their counterparts in other wage groups.

Read more.

December 17, 2012
The 4 Rich Countries Where Women Out-Earn Men (With 1 Huge Caveat)

The 4 Rich Countries Where Women Out-Earn Men (With 1 Huge Caveat)

December 13, 2012

A Whopping 369,000 Americans Missed Work Because of Sandy

[Image: Reuters]

November 27, 2012
The 20 Richest Metros in America (the First 2 Will Surprise You)
[Image: The Bureau of Economic Analysis]

The 20 Richest Metros in America (the First 2 Will Surprise You)

[Image: The Bureau of Economic Analysis]

11:06am
  
Filed under: Metropolitan Finance Urban City Chart 
November 26, 2012

5 Charts About Climate Change That Should Have You Very, Very Worried

[Images: World Bank, National Research Council, National Academy of Sciences]

November 5, 2012
Why People Don’t Vote
[Image: Gwen Sharp, Data: U.S. Census Bureau]

Why People Don’t Vote

[Image: Gwen Sharp, Data: U.S. Census Bureau]

November 5, 2012
Does Your Wage Predict Your Vote?

This is the general theory of wages and voting preferences in a sentence: The more income you make, the more likely you are to vote Republican … or to vote, at all.
It’s a long-held political axiom, and it’s upheld in a recent study by PayScale, the nation’s largest private salary survey company. In research shared with The Atlantic, they showed that Americans who make less than $70,000 (about 70% of the country) are considerably more likely to vote Democratic. Those making more than $70,000 are more likely to vote Republican. 
But the relationship between wages and voting isn’t as simple as two lines making an X.

Read more. [Image: PayScale]

Does Your Wage Predict Your Vote?

This is the general theory of wages and voting preferences in a sentence: The more income you make, the more likely you are to vote Republican … or to vote, at all.

It’s a long-held political axiom, and it’s upheld in a recent study by PayScale, the nation’s largest private salary survey company. In research shared with The Atlantic, they showed that Americans who make less than $70,000 (about 70% of the country) are considerably more likely to vote Democratic. Those making more than $70,000 are more likely to vote Republican. 

But the relationship between wages and voting isn’t as simple as two lines making an X.

Read more. [Image: PayScale]

November 2, 2012
Why the October Jobs Report Is Even Better Than It Looks
Bottom line: Whoever wins on Tuesday inherits an economy that is still awfully weak and a jobs recovery that’s clearly gaining momentum
[Image: calculatedriskblog.com]

Why the October Jobs Report Is Even Better Than It Looks

Bottom line: Whoever wins on Tuesday inherits an economy that is still awfully weak and a jobs recovery that’s clearly gaining momentum

[Image: calculatedriskblog.com]

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