April 18, 2014
Two Charts That Put China’s Pollution in Perspective

Everyone “knows” that China is badly polluted. I’ve written over the years, and still believe, that environmental sustainability in all forms is China’s biggest emergency, in every sense: for its people, for its government, for its effect on the world. And yes, I understand that the same is true for modern industrialized life in general. But China is an extreme case, and an extremely important one because of its scale.
Read more. [Image: NASA via Atlantic]

Two Charts That Put China’s Pollution in Perspective

Everyone “knows” that China is badly polluted. I’ve written over the years, and still believe, that environmental sustainability in all forms is China’s biggest emergency, in every sense: for its people, for its government, for its effect on the world. And yes, I understand that the same is true for modern industrialized life in general. But China is an extreme case, and an extremely important one because of its scale.

Read more. [Image: NASA via Atlantic]

April 16, 2014
China’s Forgotten Liberal Hero

Hu Yaobang, whose death 25 years ago triggered the Tiananmen Square protests, served China in an era of unprecedented openness. 
Read more. [Image: Wikimedia Commons]

China’s Forgotten Liberal Hero

Hu Yaobang, whose death 25 years ago triggered the Tiananmen Square protests, served China in an era of unprecedented openness. 

Read more. [Image: Wikimedia Commons]

April 11, 2014
atlanticinfocus:

From A Hundred-Pound Suit of Bees, one of 12 photos. She Ping, a 34 year-old beekeeper, covered with a swarm of bees on a small hill in southwest China’s Chongqing municipality on April 9, 2014. Ping released more than 460,000 bees, using queen bees to attract them to his body, and made himself a suit of bees that weighed 45.65kg (100 pounds) within 40 minutes. (AFP/Getty Images)

atlanticinfocus:

From A Hundred-Pound Suit of Bees, one of 12 photos. She Ping, a 34 year-old beekeeper, covered with a swarm of bees on a small hill in southwest China’s Chongqing municipality on April 9, 2014. Ping released more than 460,000 bees, using queen bees to attract them to his body, and made himself a suit of bees that weighed 45.65kg (100 pounds) within 40 minutes. (AFP/Getty Images)

April 3, 2014
The ‘Most Powerful Man in China’ Is About to Be Purged

And it’s about politics, not corruption.
Read more. [Image: Reuters/Jason Lee]

The ‘Most Powerful Man in China’ Is About to Be Purged

And it’s about politics, not corruption.

Read more. [Image: Reuters/Jason Lee]

February 13, 2014
Canada Is Ending Its Citizenship Program for Foreign Millionaires

The Canadian government’s decision to scrap its “Immigrant Investor Program” leaves 46,000 wealthy Chinese who had planned to emigrate to Canada, or at least move their money and families there, searching for a new home.
The decision, announced in Finance Minister Jim Flaherty’s budget on February 10, effectively tosses out 59,000 pending visa applications, 70 percent of them from China, according to the South China Morning Post. Under the terms of the program, applicants with a net worth of over C$1.6 million (U.S. $1.5 million) agreed to give the Canadian government an interest-free, C$800,000 loan for five years in exchange for a resident visa that could lead to citizenship.
The program drew a flood of mainland Chinese applicants via the Canadian consulate in Hong Kong, forcing Canada to freeze the approval process in mid-2012. Part of the problem was that the visa program was priced too low, Canada said, undervaluing Canadian permanent residence. There was also “little evidence that immigrant investors as a class are maintaining ties to Canada or making a positive economic contribution to the country,” the budget says.
Read more. [Image: Todd Karol/Reuters]

Canada Is Ending Its Citizenship Program for Foreign Millionaires

The Canadian government’s decision to scrap its “Immigrant Investor Program” leaves 46,000 wealthy Chinese who had planned to emigrate to Canada, or at least move their money and families there, searching for a new home.

The decision, announced in Finance Minister Jim Flaherty’s budget on February 10, effectively tosses out 59,000 pending visa applications, 70 percent of them from China, according to the South China Morning Post. Under the terms of the program, applicants with a net worth of over C$1.6 million (U.S. $1.5 million) agreed to give the Canadian government an interest-free, C$800,000 loan for five years in exchange for a resident visa that could lead to citizenship.

The program drew a flood of mainland Chinese applicants via the Canadian consulate in Hong Kong, forcing Canada to freeze the approval process in mid-2012. Part of the problem was that the visa program was priced too low, Canada said, undervaluing Canadian permanent residence. There was also “little evidence that immigrant investors as a class are maintaining ties to Canada or making a positive economic contribution to the country,” the budget says.

Read more. [Image: Todd Karol/Reuters]

February 13, 2014

Vadim and Vitaliy: The Russian Roofclimber-Photographers Who Scale the World’s Tallest Buildings

Vadim Makhorov and Vitaliy Raskalov, the masked Russian daredevils who have taunted authorities from Egypt to the Czech Republic by illegally climbing some of the most towering structures on the planet, have done it again. This time the target was the world’s second-tallest building: the 2,073-foot-high, still-under-construction Shanghai Tower in China.

The result are breathtaking. Literally. You may want to make sure you’re sitting down. Watch the men clamber in the clouds without ropes or other safety equipment, and peer down on one of the biggest cities on the globe from a tangle of metal grating and red scaffolding.

Read more.

January 29, 2014
The Countries Mentioned the Most in the State of the Union, from 1800-2014

It’s a time-honored tradition: When a U.S. president gives his State of the Union address, interest groups pore over the carefully crafted remarks line by line, word by word, to assess the administration’s priorities and blind spots. The exercise plays out, if to a lesser degree, overseas as well: The day after President Obama’s sixth address, news outlets in Kiev, Beijing, and Tehran are picking apart references to their countries.
State of the Union addresses haven’t always been such a spectacle. U.S. presidents have delivered them since 1790, but until 1913 these addresses were submitted as annual reports to Congress. When Woodrow Wilson became president, he turned the constitutionally required update on the nation’s well-being to an in-person speech.
In Tuesday night’s State of the Union address, Obama named 13 nations: Afghanistan, Burma, China, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Mali, Palestine, Somalia, Syria, Tunisia, Ukraine, and Yemen. Each has been named in previous State of the Union addresses; one, Tunisia, was first mentioned in Thomas Jefferson’s 1805 State of the Union address for its role in Mediterranean piracy. This time around, the circumstances were just a tad different.
Which countries have presidents mentioned the most in their State of the Union addresses? Which regions of the world get the most attention? And what trends can we discern over time?
Read more. [Image: Larry Downing/Reuters]

The Countries Mentioned the Most in the State of the Union, from 1800-2014

It’s a time-honored tradition: When a U.S. president gives his State of the Union address, interest groups pore over the carefully crafted remarks line by line, word by word, to assess the administration’s priorities and blind spots. The exercise plays out, if to a lesser degree, overseas as well: The day after President Obama’s sixth address, news outlets in Kiev, Beijing, and Tehran are picking apart references to their countries.

State of the Union addresses haven’t always been such a spectacle. U.S. presidents have delivered them since 1790, but until 1913 these addresses were submitted as annual reports to Congress. When Woodrow Wilson became president, he turned the constitutionally required update on the nation’s well-being to an in-person speech.

In Tuesday night’s State of the Union address, Obama named 13 nations: Afghanistan, Burma, China, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Mali, Palestine, Somalia, Syria, Tunisia, Ukraine, and Yemen. Each has been named in previous State of the Union addresses; one, Tunisia, was first mentioned in Thomas Jefferson’s 1805 State of the Union address for its role in Mediterranean piracy. This time around, the circumstances were just a tad different.

Which countries have presidents mentioned the most in their State of the Union addresses? Which regions of the world get the most attention? And what trends can we discern over time?

Read more. [Image: Larry Downing/Reuters]

January 23, 2014
Will Japan Abandon Pacifism?

It wasn’t a reassuring moment.
Speaking at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland on Wednesday, Shinzo Abe, the Japanese prime minister, compared recent tensions between China and Japan to the rivalry between the British and German empires at the start of the 20th century. Like the Chinese and Japanese are today, he noted, the British and Germans were close trading partners in 1914—until World War I broke out. Abe argued that China’s military buildup is destabilizing the region, warned of “inadvertent conflict,” and admitted that the two countries didn’t have an “explicit roadmap” to resolve one. Then the Japanese leader packed his bags and traveled to China’s rival, India, for an official visit.
Although relations between China and Japan have never been warm, diplomatic efforts between the two countries have deteriorated rapidly since November, when China unilaterally expanded its air-defense zone to include the disputed Senkaku islands in the East China Sea (China claims the five uninhabited islands, which it calls the Diaoyu islands, as its own territory). Abe, whose country has controlled the islands for decades, rebuked China’s move for “unjustly violating the freedom of aviation over the high seas.”
Read more. [Image: Yuya Shino/Reuters]

Will Japan Abandon Pacifism?

It wasn’t a reassuring moment.

Speaking at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland on Wednesday, Shinzo Abe, the Japanese prime minister, compared recent tensions between China and Japan to the rivalry between the British and German empires at the start of the 20th century. Like the Chinese and Japanese are today, he noted, the British and Germans were close trading partners in 1914—until World War I broke out. Abe argued that China’s military buildup is destabilizing the region, warned of “inadvertent conflict,” and admitted that the two countries didn’t have an “explicit roadmap” to resolve one. Then the Japanese leader packed his bags and traveled to China’s rival, India, for an official visit.

Although relations between China and Japan have never been warm, diplomatic efforts between the two countries have deteriorated rapidly since November, when China unilaterally expanded its air-defense zone to include the disputed Senkaku islands in the East China Sea (China claims the five uninhabited islands, which it calls the Diaoyu islands, as its own territory). Abe, whose country has controlled the islands for decades, rebuked China’s move for “unjustly violating the freedom of aviation over the high seas.”

Read more. [Image: Yuya Shino/Reuters]

January 22, 2014
This Little House in Wyoming Didn’t Just Get Flooded With Web Traffic from China

2710 Thomes Avenue in Cheyenne, Wyoming, is a house like many other houses in America. It’s a split-level; it has a pleasant brick facade; it boasts, if the season is right, a nicely maintained lawn.
2710 Thomes Avenue in Cheyenne, Wyoming, is also the physical address for a whole collection of shell companies. The spunky little split-level, Reuters put it in a 2011 investigation, ”serves as a little Cayman Island on the Great Plains.”
And here’s where things get interesting: Yesterday, the Cayman Island of the Great Plains collided—with China. Starting at 3:15pm local time, The Wall Street Journal reports, Chinese web users were redirected in their web searches—away from popular sites like Baidu and Weibo, and toward sites that they most decidedly had not sought out. The address for one of these was registered to a company called Dynamic Internet Technology, which helps users view sites, like Facebook and Twitter, that are blocked by the Great Firewall. (As Bill Xia, Dynamic Internet Technology’s founder, told the Journal: “It was hundreds of thousands of users per second. They were sending [all of] China to us, so it’s hundreds of millions of users.”) And even more traffic was rerouted to a block of IP addresses that are registered to a company called Sophidea Incorporated.
And what is Sophidea’s listed mailing address? Yep: 2710 Thomes Avenue in Cheyenne, Wyoming. The New York Times, in a widely circulated story headlined “Chinese Internet Traffic Redirected to Small Wyoming House,” calls the apparent censorship snafu ”one of the more bizarre twists in recent Internet memory.” 
It is. It’s like that time, in 2002, that web searches for the social news portal Sina.com were briefly redirected to a site for … Falun Gong. The irony of the whole thing—epic #censorfail!—is, for those of us with First Amendment protections we can comfortably take for granted, irresistibly delicious.
Read more. [Image: Reuters/The Atlantic]

This Little House in Wyoming Didn’t Just Get Flooded With Web Traffic from China

2710 Thomes Avenue in Cheyenne, Wyoming, is a house like many other houses in America. It’s a split-level; it has a pleasant brick facade; it boasts, if the season is right, a nicely maintained lawn.

2710 Thomes Avenue in Cheyenne, Wyoming, is also the physical address for a whole collection of shell companies. The spunky little split-level, Reuters put it in a 2011 investigation, ”serves as a little Cayman Island on the Great Plains.”

And here’s where things get interesting: Yesterday, the Cayman Island of the Great Plains collided—with China. Starting at 3:15pm local time, The Wall Street Journal reports, Chinese web users were redirected in their web searches—away from popular sites like Baidu and Weibo, and toward sites that they most decidedly had not sought out. The address for one of these was registered to a company called Dynamic Internet Technology, which helps users view sites, like Facebook and Twitter, that are blocked by the Great Firewall. (As Bill Xia, Dynamic Internet Technology’s founder, told the Journal: “It was hundreds of thousands of users per second. They were sending [all of] China to us, so it’s hundreds of millions of users.”) And even more traffic was rerouted to a block of IP addresses that are registered to a company called Sophidea Incorporated.

And what is Sophidea’s listed mailing address? Yep: 2710 Thomes Avenue in Cheyenne, Wyoming. The New York Times, in a widely circulated story headlined “Chinese Internet Traffic Redirected to Small Wyoming House,” calls the apparent censorship snafu one of the more bizarre twists in recent Internet memory.” 

It is. It’s like that time, in 2002, that web searches for the social news portal Sina.com were briefly redirected to a site for … Falun Gong. The irony of the whole thing—epic #censorfail!—is, for those of us with First Amendment protections we can comfortably take for granted, irresistibly delicious.

Read more. [Image: Reuters/The Atlantic]

January 21, 2014
When Chinese TV Rips Off The Colbert Report

BEIJING — He may be an award-winning satirist in the United States, but in China, even Stephen Colbert is not beyond parody: A provincial TV channel in the country has produced a show that borrows rather liberally from the popular American program.
The Banquet, broadcast on Ningxia Satellite TV, lifted the entire opening credits and other graphics from The Colbert Report. Everything from the host’s entrance—flying down the screen as English words buzz past—to the star-spangled background is mimicked, and even the show’s theme music, the guitar riff from “Baby Mumbles” by Cheap Trick, is reproduced note for note.
Online, Chinese were quick to criticize the rebranded show—once known by the staid name Guandian Zhisheng (Comment Matters)— which debuted this January.
Read more. [Image: Xu Mengge/Sina Weibo]

When Chinese TV Rips Off The Colbert Report

BEIJING — He may be an award-winning satirist in the United States, but in China, even Stephen Colbert is not beyond parody: A provincial TV channel in the country has produced a show that borrows rather liberally from the popular American program.

The Banquet, broadcast on Ningxia Satellite TV, lifted the entire opening credits and other graphics from The Colbert Report. Everything from the host’s entrance—flying down the screen as English words buzz past—to the star-spangled background is mimicked, and even the show’s theme music, the guitar riff from “Baby Mumbles” by Cheap Trick, is reproduced note for note.

Online, Chinese were quick to criticize the rebranded show—once known by the staid name Guandian Zhisheng (Comment Matters)— which debuted this January.

Read more. [Image: Xu Mengge/Sina Weibo]

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