March 7, 2014
'A Dancer Dies Twice': The Unique, Sad Challenges of Retiring from Ballet

On a January morning in 2012, Wendy Whelan stepped out of a cab at the New York City Ballet dance studio at Lincoln Center in Manhattan. The morning class was about to start. After changing into her dance clothes, Whelan, then 44, started warming up at the ballet barres. After a little warm up—tendu, demi-plié—she started dancing the pirouettes and gradually started doing the grand jetes. The day had begun like any other day at the New York City Ballet. She had been following the same routine for 28 years now.
Suddenly, she realized her right ankle felt a little stiff. Her joint felt locked and swollen. She thought to herself, all will be fine. I just need to get a massage, some help.
Whelan had moved to New York from Louisville, Kentucky, at age 15 in September 1982 to train at the School of American Ballet. In 1986, she became part of the New York City Ballet’s corps de ballet; in 1989, she was promoted to be the soloist. In the spring of 1991, she was promoted again, this time to the role of principal. She danced Ash that night, choreographed by the ballet master-in-chief of the New York City Ballet, Peter Martins.
he would go on to dance to the choreographies of George Balanchine, Jerome Robbins, Peter Martins, William Forsythe, Christopher Wheeldon, Jorma Elo, Twyla Tharp, Wayne McGregor, and Alexei Ratmansky, among many other top choreographers. In 2012, The New York Times hailed her as “America’s greatest contemporary ballerina.”
But the greatest contemporary ballerina danced that winter season on a stuck foot, and then in the fall of 2012, another accident happened: While rehearsing, she slipped and pulled her hamstring. Whelan didn’t give up, putting in more effort every time she danced. But by December of 2012, each time she hit the fifth position while rehearsing she felt additional pain in her hip joint. She discovered she had a labral tear in her hip.
She hasn’t been to a group ballet class since January 2013. She has not performed on City Ballet stage since December 2012. Instead, she has watched much younger dancers take on the roles she did at the New York City Ballet.
And so, for the first time in her life, she faces the challenge of a career transition.
Read more. [Image: Teresa Nobre / Flickr]

'A Dancer Dies Twice': The Unique, Sad Challenges of Retiring from Ballet

On a January morning in 2012, Wendy Whelan stepped out of a cab at the New York City Ballet dance studio at Lincoln Center in Manhattan. The morning class was about to start. After changing into her dance clothes, Whelan, then 44, started warming up at the ballet barres. After a little warm up—tendu, demi-plié—she started dancing the pirouettes and gradually started doing the grand jetes. The day had begun like any other day at the New York City Ballet. She had been following the same routine for 28 years now.

Suddenly, she realized her right ankle felt a little stiff. Her joint felt locked and swollen. She thought to herself, all will be fine. I just need to get a massage, some help.

Whelan had moved to New York from Louisville, Kentucky, at age 15 in September 1982 to train at the School of American Ballet. In 1986, she became part of the New York City Ballet’s corps de ballet; in 1989, she was promoted to be the soloist. In the spring of 1991, she was promoted again, this time to the role of principal. She danced Ash that night, choreographed by the ballet master-in-chief of the New York City Ballet, Peter Martins.

he would go on to dance to the choreographies of George Balanchine, Jerome Robbins, Peter Martins, William Forsythe, Christopher Wheeldon, Jorma Elo, Twyla Tharp, Wayne McGregor, and Alexei Ratmansky, among many other top choreographers. In 2012, The New York Times hailed her as “America’s greatest contemporary ballerina.”

But the greatest contemporary ballerina danced that winter season on a stuck foot, and then in the fall of 2012, another accident happened: While rehearsing, she slipped and pulled her hamstring. Whelan didn’t give up, putting in more effort every time she danced. But by December of 2012, each time she hit the fifth position while rehearsing she felt additional pain in her hip joint. She discovered she had a labral tear in her hip.

She hasn’t been to a group ballet class since January 2013. She has not performed on City Ballet stage since December 2012. Instead, she has watched much younger dancers take on the roles she did at the New York City Ballet.

And so, for the first time in her life, she faces the challenge of a career transition.

Read more. [Image: Teresa Nobre / Flickr]

January 24, 2014
The Grammys Are Finally, Truly Serious About Dance Music (Maybe)

The awards show may be making up for its spotty, awkward history with electronic acts by showing Kraftwerk and Daft Punk some love. 
Read more. [Image: Volker Hartmann/AP]

The Grammys Are Finally, Truly Serious About Dance Music (Maybe)

The awards show may be making up for its spotty, awkward history with electronic acts by showing Kraftwerk and Daft Punk some love.

Read more. [Image: Volker Hartmann/AP]

August 6, 2013
Soccer Isn’t for Girly-Girls? How Parents Pick the Sports Their Daughters Play

Unlike masculinity, multiple forms of femininity are seen as acceptable by parents and by children, so it’s not surprising that different gender scripts emerged for each of the three activities. The names of these different gender scripts—“graceful,” “aggressive,” and “pink”—all came from language used by parents of girls in interviews. They help us understand how parents choose among different activities for their daughters.
Read more. [Image: Famous_Amos/Flickr]

Soccer Isn’t for Girly-Girls? How Parents Pick the Sports Their Daughters Play

Unlike masculinity, multiple forms of femininity are seen as acceptable by parents and by children, so it’s not surprising that different gender scripts emerged for each of the three activities. The names of these different gender scripts—“graceful,” “aggressive,” and “pink”—all came from language used by parents of girls in interviews. They help us understand how parents choose among different activities for their daughters.

Read more. [Image: Famous_Amos/Flickr]

November 19, 2012

theatlanticvideo:

How George Balanchine Created New York City Ballet

“He taught America how to dance, generations after generations after generations — now only how to dance but how to look at dance, and he taught audiences to how to appreciate classical ballet” Peter Martins, Ballet Master in Chief at NYC Ballet, explains in this documentary portrait of George Balanchine. “There’s no one larger in the history of ballet — without exaggeration — than Balanchine.” 

The Russian choreographer co-founded NYC Ballet in 1948 and created a stunning range of ballets, from classical Tchaikovsky favorites to modern Stravinsky collaborations.

11:22am
  
Filed under: Dance Art Music Ballet 
November 8, 2012

theatlanticvideo:

Go Behind the Scenes at New York City Ballet

It’s hard to comprehend the sheer size and scope of the world-renowned dance company, but this recent promotional documentary reveals the many moving parts that come together. From the orchestra pit to rehearsal studios, it’s a virtual back stage tour. The film was directed by Nick Bentgen for N.Y.C. Ballet, following on the heels of documentaries about the costume shop, the perfect pair of ballet slippers, and how to dance a pas de deux.

3:08pm
  
Filed under: Ballet Art Dance New York City Video 
August 9, 2012
How ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’ Ended Up at a South African Arts Festival

When President Obama ditched “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” last September, ripples went global. One crossed the Atlantic and found its way to a dance studio in South Africa. There, it reached a young choreographer struggling, at that very same moment, to decide how—and if—he wanted to do a show about his own country’s troubled, long-repressed relationship with gay men in the military. This bit of news from America helped him decide, giving him not just the confidence to proceed with the project, but also proof of something he’d already suspected: that this was an issue that transcended national borders.
The resulting show, Moffie, debuted in Grahamstown at the National Arts Festival last month, to equal parts anticipation and controversy—and not just because the full-page ad in the front of the festival program featured a very naked, hard-muscled man with a rifle dangling over his privates. 

Read more. [Image: CuePix/Chris de Beer]

How ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’ Ended Up at a South African Arts Festival

When President Obama ditched “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” last September, ripples went global. One crossed the Atlantic and found its way to a dance studio in South Africa. There, it reached a young choreographer struggling, at that very same moment, to decide how—and if—he wanted to do a show about his own country’s troubled, long-repressed relationship with gay men in the military. This bit of news from America helped him decide, giving him not just the confidence to proceed with the project, but also proof of something he’d already suspected: that this was an issue that transcended national borders.

The resulting show, Moffie, debuted in Grahamstown at the National Arts Festival last month, to equal parts anticipation and controversy—and not just because the full-page ad in the front of the festival program featured a very naked, hard-muscled man with a rifle dangling over his privates. 

Read more. [Image: CuePix/Chris de Beer]

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