December 9, 2013
Disney’s Brilliant Plot to Buy All of American Pop Culture

Luke Skywalker. Princess Leia. Kermit the Frog. Miss Piggy. Spider-Man. The Incredible Hulk. Buzz Lightyear. And now, Indiana Jones.
Together, they represent the defining characters and pop culture childhood memories of millions, if not billions. And in the past decade, they’ve all been snapped up by the Walt Disney Company.
The whip-wielding archeologist became the latest addition to Disney’s stable on Friday, when the company announced it had reached a marketing and distribution agreement with Paramount Pictures to acquire control of all future Indiana Jones films. (Paramount keeps the rights to the four existing Indy movies and “will receive a financial participation on any future films,” the studios said.)
Read more. [Image: 20th Century Fox Corp]

Disney’s Brilliant Plot to Buy All of American Pop Culture

Luke Skywalker. Princess Leia. Kermit the Frog. Miss Piggy. Spider-Man. The Incredible Hulk. Buzz Lightyear. And now, Indiana Jones.

Together, they represent the defining characters and pop culture childhood memories of millions, if not billions. And in the past decade, they’ve all been snapped up by the Walt Disney Company.

The whip-wielding archeologist became the latest addition to Disney’s stable on Friday, when the company announced it had reached a marketing and distribution agreement with Paramount Pictures to acquire control of all future Indiana Jones films. (Paramount keeps the rights to the four existing Indy movies and “will receive a financial participation on any future films,” the studios said.)

Read more. [Image: 20th Century Fox Corp]

November 7, 2013
The Psychology of Giant Princess Eyes

If Ariel had normal-sized eyes, we might be less endeared to her—forced to focus more immediately on her disconcerting scaly tail.
If Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg were a Disney Princess, as one artist recently rendered her, she’d have no wrinkles, a smirk on her face, and some décolletage. 

And when Pixar redesigned Merida, the star of Brave, in May, she got a smaller waist and bigger hair.
The debate over the merits of Disney princesses is as old as time, but it’s fairly undeniable that the animated films’ female leads tend to look like a “pretty girl” cliche. 
There’s some research behind why the princess formula is so effective: Enlarged eyes, tiny chins, and short noses make them look more like babies, which creates an air of innocence and vulnerability. There’s evidence that adults who have such “babyfacedness” characteristics are seen as less smart, more congenial, and less likely to be guilty of crimes. 
Read more. [Image: JDHancock/flickr]

The Psychology of Giant Princess Eyes

If Ariel had normal-sized eyes, we might be less endeared to her—forced to focus more immediately on her disconcerting scaly tail.

If Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg were a Disney Princess, as one artist recently rendered her, she’d have no wrinkles, a smirk on her face, and some décolletage.

And when Pixar redesigned Merida, the star of Brave, in May, she got a smaller waist and bigger hair.

The debate over the merits of Disney princesses is as old as time, but it’s fairly undeniable that the animated films’ female leads tend to look like a “pretty girl” cliche. 

There’s some research behind why the princess formula is so effective: Enlarged eyes, tiny chins, and short noses make them look more like babies, which creates an air of innocence and vulnerability. There’s evidence that adults who have such “babyfacedness” characteristics are seen as less smart, more congenial, and less likely to be guilty of crimes.

Read more. [Image: JDHancock/flickr]

November 4, 2013
Why Shouldn’t Gloria Steinem Be a Disney Princess?

Halloween has come and gone, and with it that most terrifying of Halloween costumes: princesses. Angst about the ubiquitous, frivolous, artificial, beauty-obsessed femininity of Disney princesses is year-round, but is perhaps especially intense at this time of year, and that may be why David Trumble’s anti-Disney-Princess satire—a gallery of 10 inspiring female heroes, from Ruth Bader Ginsburg to Harriet Tubman to Malala Yousafzai, reimagined as princesses—is making the rounds on the web again after first appearing last May.
Trumble was initially responding to Disney’s “girlification” of Merida from Brave in their princess marketing. Trumble started thinking of great female role models, and wondering, as he put it, "How many of these women would be improved by a few extra sparkles?" The point here is supposed to be that, contrary to what Disney might be suggesting, strong, inspiring women—female role models—don’t need to be princesses, and that turning them into princesses trivializes them. Heroes don’t need sparkles, and sparkles distract from the heroines. In fact, though, Trumble’s drawings don’t so much satirize princesses as, rather wonderfully, validate them.
Read more. [Image: David Trumble]

Why Shouldn’t Gloria Steinem Be a Disney Princess?

Halloween has come and gone, and with it that most terrifying of Halloween costumes: princesses. Angst about the ubiquitous, frivolous, artificial, beauty-obsessed femininity of Disney princesses is year-round, but is perhaps especially intense at this time of year, and that may be why David Trumble’s anti-Disney-Princess satire—a gallery of 10 inspiring female heroes, from Ruth Bader Ginsburg to Harriet Tubman to Malala Yousafzai, reimagined as princesses—is making the rounds on the web again after first appearing last May.

Trumble was initially responding to Disney’s “girlification” of Merida from Brave in their princess marketing. Trumble started thinking of great female role models, and wondering, as he put it, "How many of these women would be improved by a few extra sparkles?" The point here is supposed to be that, contrary to what Disney might be suggesting, strong, inspiring women—female role models—don’t need to be princesses, and that turning them into princesses trivializes them. Heroes don’t need sparkles, and sparkles distract from the heroines. In fact, though, Trumble’s drawings don’t so much satirize princesses as, rather wonderfully, validate them.

Read more. [Image: David Trumble]

August 9, 2013
Disney’s Planes is a Weirdly Accurate Depiction of Flying

Watching a movie about airplanes is often a cringe-worthy event for a pilot, because Hollywood tends to take so many liberties with accuracy for the sake of drama. One time on the set of one of these movies, I asked the director if he knew that real planes couldn’t actually do the thing he was having them do in that scene. “I’m not really concerned with you and the six other people in America who know that,” he answered. “I’m concerned with making it exciting for the rest of the audience.”

Roger that.
So I should note, up front, that Disney’s new animated film Planes has planes doing all sorts of things they don’t do in real life—beginning with talk, laugh, cry, scheme, feel bad, and cheer.
Read more. [Image: Disney]

Disney’s Planes is a Weirdly Accurate Depiction of Flying

Watching a movie about airplanes is often a cringe-worthy event for a pilot, because Hollywood tends to take so many liberties with accuracy for the sake of drama. One time on the set of one of these movies, I asked the director if he knew that real planes couldn’t actually do the thing he was having them do in that scene. “I’m not really concerned with you and the six other people in America who know that,” he answered. “I’m concerned with making it exciting for the rest of the audience.”

Roger that.

So I should note, up front, that Disney’s new animated film Planes has planes doing all sorts of things they don’t do in real life—beginning with talk, laugh, cry, scheme, feel bad, and cheer.

Read more. [Image: Disney]

10:26am
  
Filed under: Film Planes Disney Flying Aviation 
July 10, 2013
Disney Is Not a Movie Company; It's a Television Company

5:26pm
  
Filed under: Disney The Lone Ranger 
January 11, 2013
One Dad’s Ill-Fated Battle Against the Princesses

…There is no one theme that has anywhere near the prominence and influence that Disney Princesses do. Regardless of the more recent generations of empowered princesses in Disney movies, the overall princess trope promotes traditional notions of femininity and an unhealthy focus on physical beauty. Even the most feminist-friendly princess derives her social currency, her political power, and her personal identity as “princess” from the make-believe patriarchy.
Read more. [Image: Disney]

One Dad’s Ill-Fated Battle Against the Princesses

…There is no one theme that has anywhere near the prominence and influence that Disney Princesses do. Regardless of the more recent generations of empowered princesses in Disney movies, the overall princess trope promotes traditional notions of femininity and an unhealthy focus on physical beauty. Even the most feminist-friendly princess derives her social currency, her political power, and her personal identity as “princess” from the make-believe patriarchy.

Read more. [Image: Disney]

October 30, 2012
Leia Is A Disney Princess Now

buzzfeed:

mildlyamused:

LEIA IS A DISNEY PRINCESS NOW….

whoa…

(via evangotlib)

5:21pm
  
Filed under: Lucas Disney Leia Star Wars 
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