April 15, 2014
The (Unintentional) Amazon Guide to Dealing Drugs

10:02am
  
Filed under: Technology Amazon Drugs Tech 
March 17, 2014
Five Ways the War on Drugs Makes Us Less Safe

The head of the military’s Southern Command wants more money to fight a losing battle.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

Five Ways the War on Drugs Makes Us Less Safe

The head of the military’s Southern Command wants more money to fight a losing battle.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

February 20, 2014
My Bizarre Trip to Burma’s Drug Elimination Museum

What the War on Drugs looks like in Rangoon.
Read more. [Image: Associated Press]

My Bizarre Trip to Burma’s Drug Elimination Museum

What the War on Drugs looks like in Rangoon.

Read more. [Image: Associated Press]

6:55pm
  
Filed under: Burma Rangoon War on Drugs Drugs 
January 24, 2014
Why Obama Should Back Drug-Sentencing Reform in the State of the Union

In the last week of 1963, my father, Ted Sorensen, met with President Lyndon Johnson late into the night at his Texas ranch to decide what provisions of President John F. Kennedy’s unfinished agenda to include in the upcoming State of the Union address. Last on the list was a provision for expanded federal jurisdiction over illegal drugs, which provided not only for federal criminal-law enforcement but also for expanded rehabilitation and treatment programs. 

As my father recounted in his memoir, Johnson angrily brushed aside the suggestion. “Drugs? I don’t want to have anything to do with them. Just lock them up and throw away the key!” The meeting ended, and my father deleted that portion of the speech, which famously announced the War on Poverty—but kept the drug provision in Johnson’s legislative program. This led to controlled-substance and drug-addiction reform that passed with bipartisan support in Congress. Despite Johnson’s dismissal of my father’s proposal of treatment and rehabilitation, he extolled those ideas when he signed the Narcotic Addict Rehabilitation Act into law in November 1966, describing it as a “pioneering measure” that recognizes that “treating addicts as criminals neither curtails addiction nor prevents crime.”
President Obama now has a golden opportunity in his own State of the Union to confront the U.S. government’s continued struggle to effectively legislate drugs.
Read more. [Image: Robert Galbraith/Reuters]

Why Obama Should Back Drug-Sentencing Reform in the State of the Union

In the last week of 1963, my father, Ted Sorensen, met with President Lyndon Johnson late into the night at his Texas ranch to decide what provisions of President John F. Kennedy’s unfinished agenda to include in the upcoming State of the Union address. Last on the list was a provision for expanded federal jurisdiction over illegal drugs, which provided not only for federal criminal-law enforcement but also for expanded rehabilitation and treatment programs. 

As my father recounted in his memoir, Johnson angrily brushed aside the suggestion. “Drugs? I don’t want to have anything to do with them. Just lock them up and throw away the key!” The meeting ended, and my father deleted that portion of the speech, which famously announced the War on Poverty—but kept the drug provision in Johnson’s legislative program. This led to controlled-substance and drug-addiction reform that passed with bipartisan support in Congress. Despite Johnson’s dismissal of my father’s proposal of treatment and rehabilitation, he extolled those ideas when he signed the Narcotic Addict Rehabilitation Act into law in November 1966, describing it as a “pioneering measure” that recognizes that “treating addicts as criminals neither curtails addiction nor prevents crime.”

President Obama now has a golden opportunity in his own State of the Union to confront the U.S. government’s continued struggle to effectively legislate drugs.

Read more. [Image: Robert Galbraith/Reuters]

January 14, 2014
Obamacare Is a Powerful New Crime-Fighting Tool

An astonishing two-thirds of the 730,000 prisoners released each year have substance abuse or mental health problems. But no one has been willing to pay for their treatment—until now.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

Obamacare Is a Powerful New Crime-Fighting Tool

An astonishing two-thirds of the 730,000 prisoners released each year have substance abuse or mental health problems. But no one has been willing to pay for their treatment—until now.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

December 27, 2013
Religion as a Product of Psychotropic Drugs

How much of religion was realized under the influence of mind-altering substances?
Read more. [Image: Wikimedia]

Religion as a Product of Psychotropic Drugs

How much of religion was realized under the influence of mind-altering substances?

Read more. [Image: Wikimedia]

November 13, 2013
Drugs Will Kill Your Friends

Three guys died when I was at the halfway house: Chris, Arturo, and Luke. They all died right after I left in pretty quick succession. Each one hurt like a motherfucker.
I haven’t been to war, so I can’t comment on what that experience is like, but people who go through rehab or a halfway house walk a tough road together and not all of them make it. We knew we faced a powerful adversary that demanded respect. Unlike combat, the adversary was inside of us.
Chris was the first of my friends to die. He was a “rock star” and had been in a band whose videos I’d watched on MTV in the ’80s. He was the prototypical rock dude; tall, incredibly skinny, with long dark hair and puffy bangs. When he checked into the halfway house, he had a big abscess on his arm from where he’d gotten infected shooting up speedballs. Speedballs! Coke and heroin shot into your arm—the shit that killed John Belushi. I am laughing thinking about it; who in the fuck does that unless they are fully 100 percent at peace with dying at ANY moment?
Read more. [Image: Jade Sadeghian/flickr]

Drugs Will Kill Your Friends

Three guys died when I was at the halfway house: Chris, Arturo, and Luke. They all died right after I left in pretty quick succession. Each one hurt like a motherfucker.

I haven’t been to war, so I can’t comment on what that experience is like, but people who go through rehab or a halfway house walk a tough road together and not all of them make it. We knew we faced a powerful adversary that demanded respect. Unlike combat, the adversary was inside of us.

Chris was the first of my friends to die. He was a “rock star” and had been in a band whose videos I’d watched on MTV in the ’80s. He was the prototypical rock dude; tall, incredibly skinny, with long dark hair and puffy bangs. When he checked into the halfway house, he had a big abscess on his arm from where he’d gotten infected shooting up speedballs. Speedballs! Coke and heroin shot into your arm—the shit that killed John Belushi. I am laughing thinking about it; who in the fuck does that unless they are fully 100 percent at peace with dying at ANY moment?

Read more. [Image: Jade Sadeghian/flickr]

November 13, 2013
"What’s funny to me is that I never really did drugs. I smoked a lot of pot, but I’m among those who think that doesn’t really count. Not that it can’t make your life shitty and boring and a little shorter due to pizza overindulgence and general malaise, but there are certainly plenty of perfectly well-adjusted people who smoke a doob now and then and suffer, roughly, no negative consequences. I’d take “pills” if they were handed out, and I took acid once and did mushrooms and smoked opium a few times. But that’s it. I never did coke or heroin. I believed, as I was told growing up, that crack was indeed whack, so that never called out to me. I have an explanation for that. In 1986, the Boston Celtics drafted 22-year-old Len Bias, a preternaturally gifted forward from the University of Maryland. I was nine. Right before he was supposed to join the team for training, he did some coke at a party, immediately had a heart attack, and fucking died. It was the first time I’d heard of cocaine and it was introduced to me as something that killed beautiful athletes. So COCAINE WILL KILL YOU IF YOU TRY IT EVEN ONCE was permanently imprinted on me."

Comedian Rob Delaney, on drugs and his time in rehab.

November 11, 2013
Liberia’s Top Presidential Escort Busted for Smuggling Pot with Official Jeep

The man in charge of Liberia’s presidential motorcade security was arrested over the weekend for using the lead convoy jeep, “Escort 1,” to allegedly transport 654 pounds of marijuana (enough for approximately 148,500 joints) from Sierra Leone through the border town of Bo Waterside, the Associated Press has reported. 
Read more. [Image: Ben Nelms/Reuters]

Liberia’s Top Presidential Escort Busted for Smuggling Pot with Official Jeep

The man in charge of Liberia’s presidential motorcade security was arrested over the weekend for using the lead convoy jeep, “Escort 1,” to allegedly transport 654 pounds of marijuana (enough for approximately 148,500 joints) from Sierra Leone through the border town of Bo Waterside, the Associated Press has reported.

Read more. [Image: Ben Nelms/Reuters]

November 4, 2013
The Drugs of Work-Performance Enhancement

A step beyond caffeine, an increasingly common use of ADHD medications like Adderall falls in a realm of definite benefit to productivity and focus, but arguable medical necessity.
Read more. [Image: Saad Faruque/Flickr]

The Drugs of Work-Performance Enhancement

A step beyond caffeine, an increasingly common use of ADHD medications like Adderall falls in a realm of definite benefit to productivity and focus, but arguable medical necessity.

Read more. [Image: Saad Faruque/Flickr]

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