August 13, 2013
Why More Vacation Doesn't Always Mean Happier Workers

5:25pm
  
Filed under: Vacation Work Employment 
August 6, 2013
When Male Unemployment Rises, Domestic Violence Rates Fall

A fascinating new glimpse at how gender-based jobless rates change household dynamics.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

When Male Unemployment Rises, Domestic Violence Rates Fall

A fascinating new glimpse at how gender-based jobless rates change household dynamics.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

January 11, 2013
The Biggest Myth About College Graduates and the Recession: Busted

Job prospects for young four-year college grads did dim a bit after 2007, but not terribly. Their overall employment rate dropped just a few percentage points and in response, slightly more young adults returned to school than might otherwise have decided to. There’s no sign that many more bachelor’s holders ended up working dead end jobs just to pay the bills.   
Read more. [Image: Pew Charitable Trust’s Economic Mobility Project]

The Biggest Myth About College Graduates and the Recession: Busted

Job prospects for young four-year college grads did dim a bit after 2007, but not terribly. Their overall employment rate dropped just a few percentage points and in response, slightly more young adults returned to school than might otherwise have decided to. There’s no sign that many more bachelor’s holders ended up working dead end jobs just to pay the bills.   

Read more. [Image: Pew Charitable Trust’s Economic Mobility Project]

December 13, 2012
Is This the Worst Job Listing on Earth?




The Dalkey Archive Press—conspicuously absent from Book Businessmagazine’s list of best publishers to work for— wants to expand its London office. Describing the opening they posted on their website as “sternly worded” would be euphemistic. Don’t bother applying if your cousin is about to get hitched in Brazil, because they’re only considering candidates who:




… do not have any other commitments (personal or professional) that will interfere with their work at the Press (family obligations, writing, involvement with other organizations, degrees to be finished, holidays to be taken, weddings to attend in Rio, etc.)




Still reading? Well, considering how grim publishing professionals’ prospects are these days, maybe you are. If you really want this job, be prepared to get fired over any of the following infractions:




… coming in late or leaving early without prior permission; being unavailable at night or on the weekends; failing to meet any goals; giving unsolicited advice about how to run things; taking personal phone calls during work hours; gossiping; misusing company property, including surfing the internet while at work; submission of poorly written materials; creating an atmosphere of complaint or argument; failing to respond to emails in a timely way; not showing an interest in other aspects of publishing beyond editorial; making repeated mistakes; violating company policies. 







Read more. [Image: Flickr]

Is This the Worst Job Listing on Earth?

The Dalkey Archive Press—conspicuously absent from Book Businessmagazine’s list of best publishers to work for— wants to expand its London office. Describing the opening they posted on their website as “sternly worded” would be euphemistic. Don’t bother applying if your cousin is about to get hitched in Brazil, because they’re only considering candidates who:

… do not have any other commitments (personal or professional) that will interfere with their work at the Press (family obligations, writing, involvement with other organizations, degrees to be finished, holidays to be taken, weddings to attend in Rio, etc.)

Still reading? Well, considering how grim publishing professionals’ prospects are these days, maybe you are. If you really want this job, be prepared to get fired over any of the following infractions:

… coming in late or leaving early without prior permission; being unavailable at night or on the weekends; failing to meet any goals; giving unsolicited advice about how to run things; taking personal phone calls during work hours; gossiping; misusing company property, including surfing the internet while at work; submission of poorly written materials; creating an atmosphere of complaint or argument; failing to respond to emails in a timely way; not showing an interest in other aspects of publishing beyond editorial; making repeated mistakes; violating company policies. 

Read more. [Image: Flickr]

1:00pm
  
Filed under: Employment Business Humor 
November 6, 2012
The Word That Gets Women Negotiating Their Salaries: ‘Negotiate’

Women are more likely to negotiate when an employer explicitly says that wages are negotiable. Men, on the other hand, are more likely to negotiate when the employer does not directly state that they can negotiate.

Read more. [Image: AP]

The Word That Gets Women Negotiating Their Salaries: ‘Negotiate’

Women are more likely to negotiate when an employer explicitly says that wages are negotiable. Men, on the other hand, are more likely to negotiate when the employer does not directly state that they can negotiate.

Read more. [Image: AP]

October 22, 2012
Older Workers are Keeping the Young Out of Jobs

While unemployment has soared in Europe and elsewhere, at least one group has weathered the unemployment crisis fairly well: older workers.
Then again, that may be a bad thing.
The percentage of people over 60 in the workforce has climbed steadily over the past decade. Partly it’s about 60 being the new 50, but it’s also about rising costs of living, a lack of savings, and people clinging to jobs out of fear over disappearing pensions. Between 2001 and 2011, the employment rate for people between 60 and 64 years of age in OECD countries increased to 43.1% from 35.8% (chart below). For people between 65 and 69, it rose to 22.8% from 17.5%, over the same period.
This spells bad news for young people.

Read more. [Image: OECD]

Older Workers are Keeping the Young Out of Jobs

While unemployment has soared in Europe and elsewhere, at least one group has weathered the unemployment crisis fairly well: older workers.

Then again, that may be a bad thing.

The percentage of people over 60 in the workforce has climbed steadily over the past decade. Partly it’s about 60 being the new 50, but it’s also about rising costs of living, a lack of savings, and people clinging to jobs out of fear over disappearing pensions. Between 2001 and 2011, the employment rate for people between 60 and 64 years of age in OECD countries increased to 43.1% from 35.8% (chart below). For people between 65 and 69, it rose to 22.8% from 17.5%, over the same period.

This spells bad news for young people.

Read more. [Image: OECD]

October 18, 2012

theatlanticvideo:

Trouble With Women in the Workplace? This 1950s Film Is Here to Help

Long before anyone was slinging binders full of women, men were forced to accept female coworkers out of sheer need. Women joining the workforce during World War II seems to have spawned a cottage industry in educational material about gender and work. Don’t miss this 1944 gem, Supervising Women Workers, or this manual of management tips.

October 15, 2012

'Hipster Is Not a Real Job'

That’s one of the key messages of a new ad campaign launched by the Canadian province of British Columbia. These ads appear on campuses and in transit lines in the province.

Read more. [Images: B.C.’s Jobs, Tourism and Skills Training Communications Office]

9:33am
  
Filed under: Employment Culture Hipster Urban 
May 14, 2012
Work Is Work: Why Free Internships Are Immoral 

The Labor Department’s guidelines require that internships must resemble an education rather than a job; that interns cannot work in the place of paid employees; that their their work not be of “immediate benefit” to an employer. If you’ve ever had an unpaid internship, you know that these rules are flouted more routinely than speed limits. But rather than hold up these rules as quixotic laws begging to be violated and laughed at, ask yourself three questions:
Is there no overlap between paid and unpaid work at your company?
Can you deny that unpaid internships deny to low-income students an experience that many employers consider mandatory?
Would a minimum wage salary paid to a handful of students compromise your company’s financial position? 
I cannot imagine an honest person with passing knowledge of unpaid internships in America answering any of those three questions “yes.”
Work is work, no matter who does it. It ought to be paid.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

Work Is Work: Why Free Internships Are Immoral

The Labor Department’s guidelines require that internships must resemble an education rather than a job; that interns cannot work in the place of paid employees; that their their work not be of “immediate benefit” to an employer. If you’ve ever had an unpaid internship, you know that these rules are flouted more routinely than speed limits. But rather than hold up these rules as quixotic laws begging to be violated and laughed at, ask yourself three questions:

  1. Is there no overlap between paid and unpaid work at your company?
  2. Can you deny that unpaid internships deny to low-income students an experience that many employers consider mandatory?
  3. Would a minimum wage salary paid to a handful of students compromise your company’s financial position? 
I cannot imagine an honest person with passing knowledge of unpaid internships in America answering any of those three questions “yes.”

Work is work, no matter who does it. It ought to be paid.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

April 19, 2012
The Paradox of College: The Rising Cost of Going (and Not Going!) to School

Have you heard about the dangerous, rising cost of not going to college? In the last 30 years, the typical college tuition has tripled. But over the exact same period, the earnings gap between college-educated adults and high school graduates has also tripled. In 1979, the wage difference was 75%. In 2003, it was 230%. Over the last three decades, the cost of going to college has increased at nearly the exact same rate as the cost not going to college. How can the price of getting something and not getting something both rise at the same time? That is the paradox of college costs.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

The Paradox of College: The Rising Cost of Going (and Not Going!) to School

Have you heard about the dangerous, rising cost of not going to college? In the last 30 years, the typical college tuition has tripled. But over the exact same period, the earnings gap between college-educated adults and high school graduates has also tripled. In 1979, the wage difference was 75%. In 2003, it was 230%

Over the last three decades, the cost of going to college has increased at nearly the exact same rate as the cost not going to college. How can the price of getting something and not getting something both rise at the same time? 

That is the paradox of college costs.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

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