April 9, 2014
In 1893, Someone Predicted We’d Wear Leggings as Pants

Predicting the future is no easy task. Fifty years ago, science fiction writer Isaac Asimov imagined the technology of 2014 and saw underground suburbs, cube-like televisions, and a widening gap between human civilization and “nature.” 
In other words, he got some things right and some things wrong. But 60 years before him, a different prognosticator laid out a different version of future—or, at least, a more fashionable one.
That guy on the left up there? He’s a policeman, circa 1960. The man in the middle is a soldier. According to  “W. Cade Gall,” who wrote in 1893 with pen-in-hand and tongue-seemingly-in-cheek, that’s what the fashions of the 1960s would look like.
Gall, in fact, did this for every decade. You can see his predictions below.
He was writing for The Strand Magazine, a British fiction and “general interest” publication that ran from the early 1890s to 1950. I found his story in the excellent Public Domain Review. 
Read more. [Image: Public Domain Review]

In 1893, Someone Predicted We’d Wear Leggings as Pants

Predicting the future is no easy task. Fifty years ago, science fiction writer Isaac Asimov imagined the technology of 2014 and saw underground suburbs, cube-like televisions, and a widening gap between human civilization and “nature.” 

In other words, he got some things right and some things wrong. But 60 years before him, a different prognosticator laid out a different version of future—or, at least, a more fashionable one.

That guy on the left up there? He’s a policeman, circa 1960. The man in the middle is a soldier. According to  “W. Cade Gall,” who wrote in 1893 with pen-in-hand and tongue-seemingly-in-cheek, that’s what the fashions of the 1960s would look like.

Gall, in fact, did this for every decade. You can see his predictions below.

He was writing for The Strand Magazine, a British fiction and “general interest” publication that ran from the early 1890s to 1950. I found his story in the excellent Public Domain Review.

Read more. [Image: Public Domain Review]

April 4, 2014
Fighting Drug Addiction with ‘Flash Jobs’ and High Fashion

Sweden’s Stadsmission has become the H&M of charity work.
Read more. [Image: Jonas Forth/Flickr]

Fighting Drug Addiction with ‘Flash Jobs’ and High Fashion

Sweden’s Stadsmission has become the H&M of charity work.

Read more. [Image: Jonas Forth/Flickr]

December 3, 2013
Why Does Catching Fire's Dystopian Future Look So Much Like the Past?

When The Hunger Games was released in 2012, as design critics we found its Francophile fashion, its Frank Gehry-inspired architecture, and its streamlined technology difficult to ignore—or admire. If this was the future, why did the Capitol look like the 1980s? Do we overlook evil if it’s not dressed up like Fascism? Where did Katniss get that perfectly faded housedress? Naturally, when Catching Fire came out last month, we had to go back for more.
Warning: spoilers from both books and both films ahead.
Read more. [Image: Lionsgate/Murray Close]

Why Does Catching Fire's Dystopian Future Look So Much Like the Past?

When The Hunger Games was released in 2012, as design critics we found its Francophile fashion, its Frank Gehry-inspired architecture, and its streamlined technology difficult to ignore—or admire. If this was the future, why did the Capitol look like the 1980s? Do we overlook evil if it’s not dressed up like Fascism? Where did Katniss get that perfectly faded housedress? Naturally, when Catching Fire came out last month, we had to go back for more.

Warning: spoilers from both books and both films ahead.

Read more. [Image: Lionsgate/Murray Close]

September 12, 2013
The iPhones of Fall

When Apple launched the iPhone 4 in 2010, the company’s website featured large images of the device with the text “This changes everything. Again.”
Change has been a constant refrain in Apple’s marketing over the years. The famous 1984 Macintosh ads framed the computer as an agent of revolution. And the “Think Different” ads of the 1990s implied that purchasing one of these underdog machines put you in the same company as other misunderstood genius underdogs. But it goes back further than that, too. Ads for the Apple II and the business-oriented Apple III in the early 1980s compared their power to that of famous inventors of ages past, including Henry Ford, Thomas Jefferson, and Ben Franklin, among others.
Read more.

The iPhones of Fall

When Apple launched the iPhone 4 in 2010, the company’s website featured large images of the device with the text “This changes everything. Again.”

Change has been a constant refrain in Apple’s marketing over the years. The famous 1984 Macintosh ads framed the computer as an agent of revolution. And the “Think Different” ads of the 1990s implied that purchasing one of these underdog machines put you in the same company as other misunderstood genius underdogs. But it goes back further than that, too. Ads for the Apple II and the business-oriented Apple III in the early 1980s compared their power to that of famous inventors of ages past, including Henry Ford, Thomas Jefferson, and Ben Franklin, among others.

Read more.

July 26, 2013
The World’s Oldest Textile Sees New Life in High Fashion

On a hot summer day during Berlin’s biannual fashion week, models stood on podiums in a decommissioned 1960s concrete modernist church remade into an exhibition space. Bobby Kolade’s collection was the first one visible upon entering. At center stood his show piece — a long, maple brown jacket made of Ugandan bark cloth, the oldest textile known to mankind according to UNESCO’s Intangible Cultural Heritage list.
The 26-year-old Nigerian-German designer grew up in Uganda, and moved to Berlin in 2005 to study fashion. He recently won Germany’s highest fashion prize for young designers for his first collection. But perhaps most interestingly, Kolade, a vegetarian, has hit upon the idea that bark cloth might be a viable alternative to leather.
On the sidelines of the fashion show, Kolade told me that he had seen the fabric as a child, but only recently came upon the idea of using it in clothing.
"Growing up in Kampala, I obviously saw this material. But it just wasn’t cool," he said, explaining that most Ugandans associate bark cloth with burial rituals.
Read more. [Image: Michael Scaturro]

The World’s Oldest Textile Sees New Life in High Fashion

On a hot summer day during Berlin’s biannual fashion week, models stood on podiums in a decommissioned 1960s concrete modernist church remade into an exhibition space. Bobby Kolade’s collection was the first one visible upon entering. At center stood his show piece — a long, maple brown jacket made of Ugandan bark cloth, the oldest textile known to mankind according to UNESCO’s Intangible Cultural Heritage list.

The 26-year-old Nigerian-German designer grew up in Uganda, and moved to Berlin in 2005 to study fashion. He recently won Germany’s highest fashion prize for young designers for his first collection. But perhaps most interestingly, Kolade, a vegetarian, has hit upon the idea that bark cloth might be a viable alternative to leather.

On the sidelines of the fashion show, Kolade told me that he had seen the fabric as a child, but only recently came upon the idea of using it in clothing.

"Growing up in Kampala, I obviously saw this material. But it just wasn’t cool," he said, explaining that most Ugandans associate bark cloth with burial rituals.

Read more. [Image: Michael Scaturro]

4:25pm
  
Filed under: Fashion Uganda Bark cloth 
January 24, 2013

How Much Can You Read into These Glamorous New Photos from ‘Mad Men’ Season 6?

[Images: AMC]

January 22, 2013

In Focus: The 2nd Inauguration of Barack Obama in Photos

Hundreds of thousands attended the public swearing in of President Barack Obama for his second term, and more attended the Inaugural Parade and dozens of related parties, balls, and concerts around the area. Photos [above] cover the entire event, from the long preparation, through the ceremony, to the Inaugural Balls.

See more. [Images: Getty, AP, Reuters]

January 18, 2013

Stealth Wear: An Anti-Drone Hoodie and Scarf

No, really, this garment might fool the infrared cameras mounted on drones.

[Image: Adam Harvey]

2:53pm
  
Filed under: Technology Drone War Fashion Hoodie 
December 19, 2012
Archaeologists Find World’s Oldest Bra

If a bra feels like a medieval torture device* to you, you are correct about one thing: They are, in fact, medieval (whether they are also torture really depends upon the fit). 
[Image: Institute for Archaeologies, University of Innsbruck]

Archaeologists Find World’s Oldest Bra

If a bra feels like a medieval torture device* to you, you are correct about one thing: They are, in fact, medieval (whether they are also torture really depends upon the fit). 

[Image: Institute for Archaeologies, University of Innsbruck]

November 21, 2012
The Mannequins Will Be Watching You

The company claims that the mannequins are better able to watch shoppers than wall-mounted security cameras because of their eye-level perspective and the fact that many consumer will stand and linger close to the mannequins as they examine the display. Notwithstanding whether this supposed advantage is real or just hype from a company looking to sell some souped-up mannequins, it must be said that the two modes of surveillance *feel* somehow different: We may not love wall-mounted camera surveillance, but in comparison it seems quotidian, a concession we make to store-owners looking to both protect and promote their wares. 

Read more. [Image: Shutterstock]

The Mannequins Will Be Watching You

The company claims that the mannequins are better able to watch shoppers than wall-mounted security cameras because of their eye-level perspective and the fact that many consumer will stand and linger close to the mannequins as they examine the display. Notwithstanding whether this supposed advantage is real or just hype from a company looking to sell some souped-up mannequins, it must be said that the two modes of surveillance *feel* somehow different: We may not love wall-mounted camera surveillance, but in comparison it seems quotidian, a concession we make to store-owners looking to both protect and promote their wares. 

Read more. [Image: Shutterstock]

11:08am
  
Filed under: Mannequin Fashion Privacy 
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