April 10, 2014
What’s Closer To Texas Than Texas Is To Itself?

This map shows (roughly) how large the Lone Star State is. Points in the map’s red section are closer to somewhere in Texas than the opposite sides of Texas are to each other.
That’s right: You can be in Fargo, or Atlanta, or San Diego … and be closer to Texas than Texas is to itself.
That’s what the map above says. Texas is big.
Read more. [Image: mostwrong / Reddit]

What’s Closer To Texas Than Texas Is To Itself?

This map shows (roughly) how large the Lone Star State is. Points in the map’s red section are closer to somewhere in Texas than the opposite sides of Texas are to each other.

That’s right: You can be in Fargo, or Atlanta, or San Diego … and be closer to Texas than Texas is to itself.

That’s what the map above says. Texas is big.

Read more. [Image: mostwrong / Reddit]

September 23, 2013
What Did the Continents Look Like Millions of Years Ago?

The paleo-tectonic maps of retired geologist Ronald Blakey are mesmerizing and impossible to forget once you’ve seen them. Catalogued on his website Colorado Plateau Geosystems, these maps show the world adrift, its landscapes breaking apart and reconnecting again in entirely new forms, where continents are as temporary as the island chains that regularly smash together to create them, on a timescale where even oceans that exist for tens of millions of years can disappear leaving only the subtlest of geological traces.
With a particular emphasis on North America and the U.S. southwest—where Blakey still lives, in Flagstaff, Arizona—these visually engaging reconstructions of the Earth’s distant past show how dynamic a planet we live on, and imply yet more, unrecognizable changes ahead.
Read more. [map by Ron Blakey]

What Did the Continents Look Like Millions of Years Ago?

The paleo-tectonic maps of retired geologist Ronald Blakey are mesmerizing and impossible to forget once you’ve seen them. Catalogued on his website Colorado Plateau Geosystems, these maps show the world adrift, its landscapes breaking apart and reconnecting again in entirely new forms, where continents are as temporary as the island chains that regularly smash together to create them, on a timescale where even oceans that exist for tens of millions of years can disappear leaving only the subtlest of geological traces.

With a particular emphasis on North America and the U.S. southwest—where Blakey still lives, in Flagstaff, Arizona—these visually engaging reconstructions of the Earth’s distant past show how dynamic a planet we live on, and imply yet more, unrecognizable changes ahead.

Read more. [map by Ron Blakey]

3:25pm
  
Filed under: History Science Geology Geography 
January 7, 2013

In Focus: Winners of the National Geographic Photo Contest 2012

The winners have just been announced of this year’s National Geographic photo contest. The Society received more than 22,000 entries from over 150 countries. Presented here are the winners from the three categories of People, Places, and Nature, captions provided by the photographers. The Grand Prize Winner receives $10,000 and a trip to National Geographic headquarters in Washington, D.C., to participate in the annual National Geographic Photography Seminar in January 2013. Be sure to also see earlier In Focus collections of entries:Part I and Part II.

See more. [Images: National Geographic Photo Contest]

November 12, 2012

America’s Most Popular Music Scenes

[Images: MPI’s Zara Matheson]

12:08pm
  
Filed under: Music Geography Country Rock Indie 
October 22, 2012
A Terrifying Map of Boy Scout Sexual Abuse Allegations
[Image: LATimes.com]

A Terrifying Map of Boy Scout Sexual Abuse Allegations

[Image: LATimes.com]

October 10, 2012

A Google Map of Mexico City’s Street Vendors

Scientists will sometimes stain a certain element of organic matter to enhance its visibility under a microscope. These surreal and sharply colored images could be mistaken for such contrast-enhanced biological material.

They are actually Google Earth photos of tianguis, the famous street markets that spring up all across the Distrito Federal. In a collection compiled by Fabian Neuhaus of UrbanTick, and featured on Nicola Twiley’s Edible Geography on Monday, the markets — sheltered beneath red plastic tarps, which gives them their distinctive appearance from the air - look more like living organisms than groups of merchants. They sprawl down certain streets, seemingly chosen at random from an endless grid, turning corners or branching off into side streets. Their logic, from above, is mysterious and undeniable.

Read more. [Image: Flickr/UrbanTick]

August 20, 2012

The Geography of Craft Beer

America has more craft beer breweries today than at any other point since 1887. Merriam-Webster added the term to their dictionary this year. Even President Obama has his own brew

The number of breweries is increasing dramatically, according to the Brewer’s Association, a trade organization — just take a glance at this nifty chart on their website — and 350 more were added between June and the same time last year. Among these breweries, 97 percent are “craft brewers" — meaning they are relatively low-production, independently owned, and "interpret historic styles with unique twists and develop new styles that have no precedent."

Read more. [Images: Martin Prosperity Institute]

11:26am
  
Filed under: Geography Beer Food Map 
August 15, 2012

In Focus: Winners of the National Geographic Photo Contest 2012

These eleven images were chosen from more than 12,000 entries submitted by 6,615 photographers from 152 countries. National Geographic was kind enough to allow me to share the winning photographs with you here, from four categories: Travel Portraits, Outdoor Scenes, Sense of Place, and Spontaneous Moments.

See more. [Images: Michelle Schantz, Vo Anh Kiet, Lucia Griggi, Camila Massu]

August 14, 2012

The Dubious Spread of ‘Très Brooklyn’

[…] A brief reminder of what Brooklyn used to be: “unsophisticated and unfashionable, the butt of the kind of jokes now directed at New Jersey.” Also, ”synonymous with crime, drugs and welfare.” But flash forward to 2012 and now it’s a “brand,” according to one Brooklynite quoted. Even if there are still murders, poverty, crime, and so on. Even if there are many, many different parts of Brooklyn, in which many, many different things happen, things other than artisanal pickle-making. 

Read more. [Images: Flickr/Wally Gobetz, BushwickDaily.com]

August 14, 2012

Using Uber Ridership to Compare Cities and Neighborhoods 

In fact, we can quantify how city-like or not city-like any given neighborhood is. That is, we can ask, “how San Francisco-like is the Mission, really?” and “how much more like New York is the Financial District than it is San Francisco?”

And we can do this for every neighborhood. What do we find?

Cities have “stereotypical” neighborhoods that very strongly match the flow of their home cities, and some neighborhoods just don’t really seem to belong to their home city. They’re outliers.

Read more. [Image: Uber]

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