March 17, 2014

In Focus: Holi 2014, the Festival of Colors

This week Hindus around the world celebrate Holi, the Festival of Colors. Holi is a popular springtime celebration observed on the last full moon of the lunar month. Participants traditionally throw bright, vibrant powders at friends and strangers alike as they celebrate the arrival of spring, commemorate Krishna’s pranks, and allow each other a momentary freedom — a chance to drop their inhibitions and simply play and dance. Gathered here are images of this year’s Holi festival from across India. See also India’s ‘High’ Holiday

Read more.

1:25pm
  
Filed under: In Focus Photography India Holi 
March 17, 2014
India’s ‘High’ Holiday

HYDERABAD, India—To get to Bandosingh Hazaari’s bhang shop you have to follow the gods.
In the maze of nameless alleys in Dhoolpet, a working-class neighborhood in the southeastern Indian city of Hyderabad, enormous fiberglass figures of Hindu gods and goddesses peek out of temple doors and between buildings. It’s a part of the city that’s known for creating and selling these 30-foot avatars, which are used in festivals and parades.
It’s also known for selling bhang—cannabis leaves that are crushed, mixed into drinks and sweets, and often served during Hindu holidays like Holi, the celebration of color and spring. During the festival, which falls on March 17 this year, crowds gather in Indian cities to throw colored powder and water on friends and strangers, leaving the streets tie-dyed and the air hazy with ribbons of rainbow dust. In a country where possessing and selling cannabis is generally prohibited, and where levels of cannabis use are low relative to other countries, it’s one day of the year when consuming marijuana is socially acceptable. There are even Bollywood songs extolling bhang’s virtues.
Read more. [Image: Reuters/Amit Dave]

India’s ‘High’ Holiday

HYDERABAD, India—To get to Bandosingh Hazaari’s bhang shop you have to follow the gods.

In the maze of nameless alleys in Dhoolpet, a working-class neighborhood in the southeastern Indian city of Hyderabad, enormous fiberglass figures of Hindu gods and goddesses peek out of temple doors and between buildings. It’s a part of the city that’s known for creating and selling these 30-foot avatars, which are used in festivals and parades.

It’s also known for selling bhang—cannabis leaves that are crushed, mixed into drinks and sweets, and often served during Hindu holidays like Holi, the celebration of color and spring. During the festival, which falls on March 17 this year, crowds gather in Indian cities to throw colored powder and water on friends and strangers, leaving the streets tie-dyed and the air hazy with ribbons of rainbow dust. In a country where possessing and selling cannabis is generally prohibited, and where levels of cannabis use are low relative to other countries, it’s one day of the year when consuming marijuana is socially acceptable. There are even Bollywood songs extolling bhang’s virtues.

Read more. [Image: Reuters/Amit Dave]

11:25am
  
Filed under: India Holi Bhang Marijuana 
April 16, 2012

Holi, the Festival of Color, Explodes in Ultra Slow Motion

Thousands of Hindus celebrate the spring festival of Holi by throwing tinted powder and perfume on each other — creating a breathtaking hypercolor frenzy. Filmmakers at the production company Variable decided to capture the event with a Phantom Flex, a high-speed camera that records upwards of 10,000 frames per second. Suspending these moments in time, they want viewers to realize that “the fast paced lifestyles of our generation result in many not taking the necessary step back to soak in the existing world around us.” Their goal, they say, “is to help viewers further appreciate and take notice of the beauty in life and culture.”

[Video: Variable]

4:13pm
  
Filed under: World news Holi Hinduism Hindu 
March 8, 2012

In Focus: The Colors of Holi 2012

Around the world, Hindus are celebrating Holi, the Festival of Colors. Holi is a popular springtime celebrations observed on the last full moon of the lunar month. Participants traditionally throw bright, vibrant powders at friends and strangers alike, celebrating the arrival of Spring, commemorating Krishna’s pranks, and allowing everyone a momentary freedom — a chance to drop their inhibitions and simply play and dance. Gathered in this collection are images of this year’s Holi festival from across India and several other countries.

See more. [Images: AP and Reuters]

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