August 29, 2011
Hurricane Irene

Over the past week, Hurricane Irene grew from a tropical cyclone in the Caribbean to a category 3 hurricane as it blew north along the East Coast of the United States. High winds and tremendous rainfall downed trees and battered shorelines, leaving millions without power and causing some 26 deaths across nine states. Though Irene was downgraded to a tropical storm as it made landfall in New York, the heavy downpours have caused flooding problems across many states that are still unfolding.
Above: Betty Walsh, a local resident, crosses a flooded street in Red Hook, on August 28, 2011 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City, after Tropical Storm Irene had passed by. (Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images)

See more excellent hurricane photos at In Focus

Hurricane Irene

Over the past week, Hurricane Irene grew from a tropical cyclone in the Caribbean to a category 3 hurricane as it blew north along the East Coast of the United States. High winds and tremendous rainfall downed trees and battered shorelines, leaving millions without power and causing some 26 deaths across nine states. Though Irene was downgraded to a tropical storm as it made landfall in New York, the heavy downpours have caused flooding problems across many states that are still unfolding.

Above: Betty Walsh, a local resident, crosses a flooded street in Red Hook, on August 28, 2011 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City, after Tropical Storm Irene had passed by. (Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images)

See more excellent hurricane photos at In Focus

August 26, 2011
jasencomstock:

joshsternberg:

Nate Silver spreading the joy with some numbers:

The numbers do not paint a pretty picture. According the model, a hurricane with windspeeds of about 100 miles per hour — making it a “weak” Category 2 storm — might cause on the order of $35 billion in damage if it were to pass directly over Manhattan. Such a storm would probably flood New York’s subway system as well as acres upon acres of prime real estate in neighborhoods like the East Village, the Financial District, Tribeca, Coney Island, Red Hook, DUMBO, as well as parts of Staten Island and most of the Rockaways.

Read the rest of the article to learn how costly different strength hurricanes would be if they hit directly over NYC. 
Happy Friday!

Isn’t $16T a bit much for even the total destruction of Manhattan? I mean, we could still pick up all the money after the fact and give it back to everyone else.

jasencomstock:

joshsternberg:

Nate Silver spreading the joy with some numbers:

The numbers do not paint a pretty picture. According the model, a hurricane with windspeeds of about 100 miles per hour — making it a “weak” Category 2 storm — might cause on the order of $35 billion in damage if it were to pass directly over Manhattan. Such a storm would probably flood New York’s subway system as well as acres upon acres of prime real estate in neighborhoods like the East Village, the Financial District, Tribeca, Coney Island, Red Hook, DUMBO, as well as parts of Staten Island and most of the Rockaways.

Read the rest of the article to learn how costly different strength hurricanes would be if they hit directly over NYC.

Happy Friday!

Isn’t $16T a bit much for even the total destruction of Manhattan? I mean, we could still pick up all the money after the fact and give it back to everyone else.

(Source: joshsternberg, via jasencomstock-deactivated201306)

August 25, 2011

Hurricane Irene’s Terrifying Scale as Seen From Space

August 24, 2011
shortformblog:

Hurricane Irene possibly about to ruin your weekend, East Coasters
Yeah, that’s possibly heading for DC, too: Days after the U.S. capitol felt an earthquake for probably the first time ever, they may just have to deal with a Category 2 hurricane. Hurricane Irene, which has been picking up steam for a few weeks, looks most certain to hit North Carolina as a Category 3, and will likely go up the coast, possibly hitting such hurricane-prone locales as DC, NYC and Boston along the way. Hoping it’s just a brush, kids. source
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shortformblog:

Yeah, that’s possibly heading for DC, too: Days after the U.S. capitol felt an earthquake for probably the first time ever, they may just have to deal with a Category 2 hurricane. Hurricane Irene, which has been picking up steam for a few weeks, looks most certain to hit North Carolina as a Category 3, and will likely go up the coast, possibly hitting such hurricane-prone locales as DC, NYC and Boston along the way. Hoping it’s just a brush, kids. source

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(Source: shortformblog)

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