May 13, 2014
How Local Governments Are Hacking Immigration Reform

Only the federal government can grant amnesty. But cities and counties can effectively opt to stop deportations—and increasingly, they are.
Read more. [Image: Jim Young/Reuters]

How Local Governments Are Hacking Immigration Reform

Only the federal government can grant amnesty. But cities and counties can effectively opt to stop deportations—and increasingly, they are.

Read more. [Image: Jim Young/Reuters]

May 5, 2014
Where the World's Refugees Go (and Where They Shouldn't)

March 4, 2014
How Immigration Can Restrict and Enhance Liberty

An argument for letting in more newcomers—and a warning about a potential pitfall.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

How Immigration Can Restrict and Enhance Liberty

An argument for letting in more newcomers—and a warning about a potential pitfall.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

11:25am
  
Filed under: Politics Immigration Liberty 
January 30, 2014
Immigration Is the Only Reason the U.S. Doesn’t Have an Aging Crisis

The U.S. is getting older, but not as quickly as parts of Europe and Asia. The influx of immigrants and their high fertility rates are the main reasons why.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

Immigration Is the Only Reason the U.S. Doesn’t Have an Aging Crisis

The U.S. is getting older, but not as quickly as parts of Europe and Asia. The influx of immigrants and their high fertility rates are the main reasons why.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

January 28, 2014
Everything You Need to Know About the State of the Union Address

Tonight at 9 p.m., President Obama will step up to the dais in the House of Representatives for his fifth State of the Union Address. The narrative of the night, by pundit acclamation, is how Obama will try to get his groove back. It’s been a rough 12 months since his last State of the Union: Congress still hasn’t passed an immigration-reform bill. His push for gun control fell apart in the face of Republican opposition. And though the government shutdown looked like a major political victory, it was soon followed by the catastrophic Healthcare.gov relaunch, an even more major political stumble from which he’s still regaining his footing.
Don’t buy it. Even if Obama delivered a barnburner, it wouldn’t move the dial much. Speeches—even the State of the Union—don’t do much to turn polling around or radically shift Congress. Though it’s hard to remember now, Obama finished off last year’s address with an emotionally charged and widely praised call on Congress to honor the victims of gun violence by at least voting on new safety measures, a demand Congress blithely ignored.
In any case, this is expected to be a more tempered speech. But that doesn’t mean it doesn’t matter. Even in a modern age of dwindling audience, the State of the Union draws more views than any political event all year and sets the agenda for White House policy and the nation for 2014. Here’s what to watch for.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

Everything You Need to Know About the State of the Union Address

Tonight at 9 p.m., President Obama will step up to the dais in the House of Representatives for his fifth State of the Union Address. The narrative of the night, by pundit acclamation, is how Obama will try to get his groove back. It’s been a rough 12 months since his last State of the Union: Congress still hasn’t passed an immigration-reform bill. His push for gun control fell apart in the face of Republican opposition. And though the government shutdown looked like a major political victory, it was soon followed by the catastrophic Healthcare.gov relaunch, an even more major political stumble from which he’s still regaining his footing.

Don’t buy it. Even if Obama delivered a barnburner, it wouldn’t move the dial much. Speeches—even the State of the Union—don’t do much to turn polling around or radically shift Congress. Though it’s hard to remember now, Obama finished off last year’s address with an emotionally charged and widely praised call on Congress to honor the victims of gun violence by at least voting on new safety measures, a demand Congress blithely ignored.

In any case, this is expected to be a more tempered speech. But that doesn’t mean it doesn’t matter. Even in a modern age of dwindling audience, the State of the Union draws more views than any political event all year and sets the agenda for White House policy and the nation for 2014. Here’s what to watch for.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

November 20, 2013
Why Are Immigrants Being Deported for Minor Crimes?

Since 1996, hundreds of thousands of longtime U.S. residents have been sent back to their native countries for small, non-violent infractions—and without courtroom trials.
Read more. [Image: Immigrant Justice Network]

Why Are Immigrants Being Deported for Minor Crimes?

Since 1996, hundreds of thousands of longtime U.S. residents have been sent back to their native countries for small, non-violent infractions—and without courtroom trials.

Read more. [Image: Immigrant Justice Network]

October 23, 2013
Immigration Reform Is Only Mostly Dead

Rep. Raul Labrador, an Idaho Republican, declared immigration reform dead, so why aren’t the opponents of a big overhaul pouring the champagne?

Because they know better than anyone that the issue could be resurrected at any time.

When President Obama declared immigration reform his top post-shutdown priority, opponents of a pathway to citizenship could have declared victory then and there. The president’s advocacy gives House Republicans an easy way to ignore the issue, much like a teenager tunes out a nagging mother. The bad blood between the White House and Speaker John Boehner got worse during the government shutdown, making bipartisan negotiations on other issues more difficult. Republicans also flinch at the thought of giving Obama another legacy victory.
All this should add up to a dead issue.
Read more. [Image: Gage Skidmore/Flickr]

Immigration Reform Is Only Mostly Dead

Rep. Raul Labrador, an Idaho Republican, declared immigration reform dead, so why aren’t the opponents of a big overhaul pouring the champagne?

Because they know better than anyone that the issue could be resurrected at any time.

When President Obama declared immigration reform his top post-shutdown priority, opponents of a pathway to citizenship could have declared victory then and there. The president’s advocacy gives House Republicans an easy way to ignore the issue, much like a teenager tunes out a nagging mother. The bad blood between the White House and Speaker John Boehner got worse during the government shutdown, making bipartisan negotiations on other issues more difficult. Republicans also flinch at the thought of giving Obama another legacy victory.

All this should add up to a dead issue.

Read more. [Image: Gage Skidmore/Flickr]

September 30, 2013
The 10 Stealth Economic Trends that Rule the World Today

What’s going on in the world today? It’s hard to keep up. Some facts are familiar to anyone who reads the news. Unemployment is high. Growth is slow. Shale gas is a big deal. But beyond the caps-lock headlines, subtler, but no less significant, shifts are changing the U.S. economy and reshaping the global financial order. Here are ten that have surprised—and might surprise.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

The 10 Stealth Economic Trends that Rule the World Today

What’s going on in the world today? It’s hard to keep up. Some facts are familiar to anyone who reads the news. Unemployment is high. Growth is slow. Shale gas is a big deal. But beyond the caps-lock headlines, subtler, but no less significant, shifts are changing the U.S. economy and reshaping the global financial order. Here are ten that have surprised—and might surprise.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

September 17, 2013
232 Million People Left Their Countries For New Ones. Where Did They Go?

The United Nations recently released new data showing that 232 million people, or 3.2 percent of the world’s population, live outside of their countries of birth. This global diaspora has big implications as countries try to balance growth with unease over outsiders. So where are all of these people anyway? And are they helping or hurting their new homes?  
Read more. [Image: Marko Djurica]

232 Million People Left Their Countries For New Ones. Where Did They Go?

The United Nations recently released new data showing that 232 million people, or 3.2 percent of the world’s population, live outside of their countries of birth. This global diaspora has big implications as countries try to balance growth with unease over outsiders. So where are all of these people anyway? And are they helping or hurting their new homes?  

Read more. [Image: Marko Djurica]

3:55pm
  
Filed under: Immigration Migration 
August 28, 2013
Obama’s Immigration Nuclear Option: Stopping Deportations Unilaterally

The biggest obstacle facing immigration reform may be not opposition but inertia. Leaders of the House of Representatives have said they plan to act, but with the coming months likely to be consumed by budget drama, immigration could fall by the wayside.
If that happens, advocates of immigration reform have another idea: They’ll push Obama to press the button on the immigration-reform nuclear option.
The option commonly referred to by immigration reformers as “Plan B” would see the president take executive action to prevent undocumented immigrants from being deported — along the lines of the deferred-action program the administration created for “Dreamers” last year. It wouldn’t be a panacea, and it wouldn’t give them citizenship. But such an action could at least spare some from the constant threat of deportation. And perhaps just as important, it could exact major political revenge on Republicans, galvanizing the Hispanic electorate against them and further hurting their image with the fastest-growing segment of voters.
Read more. [Image: Jonathan Ernst/Reuters]

Obama’s Immigration Nuclear Option: Stopping Deportations Unilaterally

The biggest obstacle facing immigration reform may be not opposition but inertia. Leaders of the House of Representatives have said they plan to act, but with the coming months likely to be consumed by budget drama, immigration could fall by the wayside.

If that happens, advocates of immigration reform have another idea: They’ll push Obama to press the button on the immigration-reform nuclear option.

The option commonly referred to by immigration reformers as “Plan B” would see the president take executive action to prevent undocumented immigrants from being deported — along the lines of the deferred-action program the administration created for “Dreamers” last year. It wouldn’t be a panacea, and it wouldn’t give them citizenship. But such an action could at least spare some from the constant threat of deportation. And perhaps just as important, it could exact major political revenge on Republicans, galvanizing the Hispanic electorate against them and further hurting their image with the fastest-growing segment of voters.

Read more. [Image: Jonathan Ernst/Reuters]

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